Category Archives: ARCHITECTURE

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© Iwan Baan

Serpentine Gallery Art Pavilion 2013 / Sou Fujimoto

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[highlight1]  Serpentine Gallery Art Pavilion 2013  [/highlight1]

[dropcap]S[/dropcap]erpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 – The latest pavilion, designed by Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto, opened on 8 June and runs until 20 October. Fujimoto, the youngest of the 13 architects tapped for the annual pavilion in London’s Kensington Gardens, envisioned the structure as an assemblage of white grids that is organic, almost cloudlike.

© Ben Stansall© Ben Stansall

Architect Sou Fujimoto discusses his visionary design for the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013, a delicate, cloud-like structure that experiments with immateriality and weightlessness. Inspired by organic structures, such as the forest, the nest and the cave, Fujimoto’s signature buildings inhabit a space between nature and artificiality.

  • “It is a really fundamental question how architecture is different from nature, or how architecture could be part of nature, or how they could be merged…what are the boundaries between nature and artificial things.” – Sou Fujimoto
  • “Within the pastoral context of Kensington Gardens, I envisage the vivid greenery of the surrounding plant life woven together with a constructed geometry,” – Sou Fujimoto
  •  “A new form of environment will be created, where the natural and the man-made merge; not solely architectural nor solely natural, but a unique meeting of the two.” – Sou Fujimoto

© Nargess Shahmanesh Banks© Nargess Shahmanesh Banks

The structure, built with 8km of steel tubing in 27,000 lengths, features elevated seating platforms and an undercroft café protected from the rain with polycarbonate discs.

The proposed structure consists of several steel trusses with 20 mm, resulting in a lightweight and transparent appearance, like a cloud merging with the landscape and the classical forms of the Gallery’s colonnade. With an area of about 350 m2, the structure was designed as a social space, flexible and multipurpose, where visitors are invited to enter and interact in various ways.

© Nargess Shahmanesh Banks© Nargess Shahmanesh Banks

Described by Fujimoto as a ‘frame cloud and a polycarbonate cloud’, the pavilion, engineered by Aecom and built by Stage One, is composed of 20mm hollow steel piping formed into two cube units of 400mm x 400m and 800mm x 800mm. The units were welded into approximately 55 large sections, transported by lorry and bolted into place to form the cloud on site. The bolts in the sleeved connections were then sawn off and painted on site.

Fujimoto’s is the 13th pavilion in the longstanding series which has welcomed architects including Herzog & de Meuron, Jean Nouvel, Zaha Hadid and Frank Gehry. Programme directors Julia Peyton Jones and Hans Ulrich Obrist said the selection of Fujimoto was a deliberate move towards the inclusion of a ‘younger generation’ of architects to work on the famous commission.

© Nargess Shahmanesh Banks© Nargess Shahmanesh Banks

  • Peyton Jones said, ‘We are trying to create a balance through the architects we invite. We need to limit ourselves to architects who have sufficient means to make this commission a priority. Sou has a young, galvanized team. His office is resolutely low-tech, where the hand is ever present. He has kindly donated his sketchbooks from his work on the pavilion, and they are full of drawings and ideas. We adored working with him.’
  • David Glover, chief executive of Aecom, said the biggest challenge was the speed of design and construction of the complex structure, including the sourcing of the material, which was supplied by three different manufacturers. The engineers had six weeks to work on the design with Fujimoto, six weeks for its manufacture, and six weeks on site.
  • “This is an exciting and challenging opportunity for our team,” commented Glover. “Sou Fujimoto has designed a very complex structure made up of over 20,000 individual elements and 9,000 nodes compared to the 1,000 to 2,000 found in a typical building. This tubular steel frame and the integral poly-carbonate discs and seating elements are designed to work as a single element. As you would expect, the quality of the detailing and fabrication is fundamental part of the pavilion’s design, so our work will be on show for everyone to see. While this has certainly generated some pressure, we also look forward to having visitors ask themselves ‘How did they manage to achieve that?'”
  • The tubular steel frame, and the integral polycarbonate discs and seating plans are designed to work as a single element,” adds Glover. “As you would expect, the quality of the detailing and fabrication is a fundamental part of the design, so our expertise will be on display for everyone to see. While this has certainly been a challenging project, we also look forward to having visitors ask themselves, ‘How did they manage to achieve that?’.”

© Iwan Baan© Iwan Baan

The design envisions a translucent structure made up of a series of modules that stands out from past pavilions in that it is all structural with no traditional cladding, rather it relies on the poly-carbonate discs to provide protection from the elements. This enables it to interact with the changing light to create different experiences for visitors throughout the day.

© Lefteris Pitarakis© Lefteris Pitarakis

Serpentine Gallery

The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 is designed by multi award-winning Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto.

He is the thirteenth and, at 41, youngest architect to accept the invitation to design a temporary structure for the Serpentine Gallery. The most ambitious architectural programme of its kind worldwide, the Serpentine’s annual Pavilion commission is one of the most anticipated events on the cultural calendar. Past Pavilions have included designs by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei (2012), Frank Gehry (2008), the late Oscar Niemeyer (2003) and Zaha Hadid, who designed the inaugural structure in 2000.

Widely acknowledged as one of the most important architects coming to prominence worldwide, Sou Fujimoto is the leading light of an exciting generation of artists who are re-inventing our relationship with the built environment. Inspired by organic structures, such as the forest, the nest and the cave, Fujimoto’s signature buildings inhabit a space between nature and artificiality. Fujimoto has completed the majority of his buildings in Japan, with commissions ranging from the domestic, such as Final Wooden House, T House and House N, to the institutional, such as the Musashino Art Museum and Library at Musashino Art University.

© Ray Tang© Ray Tang

Occupying some 350 square-metres of lawn in front of the Serpentine Gallery, Sou Fujimoto’s delicate, latticed structure of 20mm steel poles will have a lightweight and semi-transparent appearance that will allow it to blend, cloud-like, into the landscape and against the classical backdrop of the Gallery’s colonnaded East wing. Designed as a flexible, multi-purpose social space – with a café sited inside – visitors will be encouraged to enter and interact with the Pavilion in different ways throughout its four-month tenure in London’s Kensington Gardens.

AECOM have provided engineering and technical design services for the Pavilion for 2013. David Glover, AECOM’s global chief executive for building engineering, has worked on the designs of many previous Pavilions. Julia Peyton-Jones, Director, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director, Serpentine Gallery, said: “Art and architecture is always experienced within the context of nature at the Serpentine. Like the park that surrounds the Gallery, Sou Fujimoto’s extraordinary design for our new Pavilion inhabits a space between nature and artificiality. While the structure blends, cloud-like into its natural surroundings, the intricate matrix of interlinking grids suggests a digital aesthetic that resonates with our age. This harmonious combination of architecture, technology and nature makes it the perfect landmark for the Serpentine Gallery, for Kensington Gardens and for London this summer. We are thrilled with the result and hope everyone who can, will come and see it.”

  • “We are thrilled to be working with one of the most fascinating architects in the world today. A visionary, who has conceived an extraordinary response to our invitation to design the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, Sou Fujimoto has designed a structure that will enthral everyone that encounters it throughout the summer.” – Julia Peyton-Jones, Director, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director, Serpentine Gallery, said

© Ray Tang© Ray Tang

Sou Fujimoto

“For the 2013 Pavilion I propose an architectural landscape: a transparent terrain that encourages people to interact with and explore the site in diverse ways. Within the pastoral context of Kensington Gardens, I envisage the vivid greenery of the surrounding plant life woven together with a constructed geometry. A new form of environment will be created, where the natural and the man-made merge; not solely architectural nor solely natural, but a unique meeting of the two.

© Christian Sinibaldi for the Guardian© Christian Sinibaldi for the Guardian

The Pavilion will be a delicate, three-dimensional structure, each unit of which will be composed of fine steel bars. It will form a semi-transparent, irregular ring, simultaneously protecting visitors from the elements while allowing them to remain part of the landscape. The overall footprint will be 350 square-metres and the Pavilion will have two entrances. A series of stepped terraces will provide seating areas that will allow the Pavilion to be used as a flexible, multi-purpose social space.

The delicate quality of the structure, enhanced by its semi-transparency, will create a geometric, cloud-like form, as if it were mist rising from the undulations of the park. From certain vantage points, the Pavilion will appear to merge with the classical structure of the Serpentine Gallery, with visitors suspended in space.”

© Jim Stephenson© Jim Stephenson

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion History:

The Pavilion architects to date are: Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei, 2012; Peter Zumthor, 2011; Jean Nouvel, 2010; Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, SANAA, 2009; Frank Gehry, 2008; Olafur Eliasson and Kjetil Thorsen, 2007; Rem Koolhaas and Cecil Balmond, with Arup, 2006; Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura with Cecil Balmond, Arup, 2005; MVRDV with Arup, 2004 (unrealised); Oscar Niemeyer, 2003; Toyo Ito and Cecil Balmond – with Arup, 2002; Daniel Libeskind with Arup, 2001; and Zaha Hadid, 2000.

  • There is no budget for the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion commission. It is paid for by sponsorship, sponsorship help-in-kind, and the sale of the finished structure, which does not cover more than 40% of its cost. The Serpentine Gallery collaborates with a range of companies and individuals whose support makes it possible to realise the Pavilion.
  • Sou Fujimoto’s temporary Serpentine Gallery Pavilion will be in Kensington Gardens, London W2 until 20 October 2013. For more details visit www.serpentinegallery.org

© Lewis Ronald© Lewis Ronald

About the Serpentine Gallery:

The Serpentine Gallery is one of the UK’s best-loved galleries for modern and contemporary art, and is the only publicly-funded, modern and contemporary art gallery in London to consistently maintain free admission.

Since 1970, the Serpentine has gained an international reputation for excellence, presenting pioneering exhibitions of 1,600 artists, architects and designers in 43 years. The Gallery, a Grade II-listed former tea pavilion, underwent a major renovation in 1998 under the Patronage of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Later this year, the Serpentine will open its new space, the Serpentine Sackler Gallery. This innovative arts venue for the 21st century will be housed in the Grade II-listed artillery store formerly known as The Magazine, which is being renovated and extended by Pritzker-Prize winning architect Zaha Hadid. Providing London with a new cultural destination, the Serpentine Sackler Gallery is will be situated just a five-minute walk from the Serpentine Gallery in Kensington Gardens.

Named after Dr Mortimer and Theresa Sackler, whose foundation has made the project possible, the Serpentine Sackler Gallery will offer nearly 900 square metres of exhibition and social space. The adjoining extension will be used as a restaurant/café, creating a permanent architectural landmark in the heart of London.

© Ray Tang© Ray Tang

[highlight1]  Project Data  [/highlight1]

Project name: Serpentine Gallery Art Pavilion 2013
Location: Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, South Kensington, London W2 3XA, United Kingdom
Coordinates: 51.504575,-0.174467
Type: Pavilion, Art in Architecture
Specific Use of Building: Temporary Exhibition Space Pavilion
Materials: tubular steel frame and the integral poly-carbonate discs
Project Area: 350 sqm
Construction Year: 2013
Open to the public: 8 June – 20 October, 2013
Status: Completed
Completion Year: 2013

[highlight1]  The people  [/highlight1]

Client / Owner / Developer: Serpentine Gallery
Architects: Sou Fujimoto – Sou Fujimoto Architects – Ichikawa Seihon building 6F 10-3, Higashienoki-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Architectural Design Team: Nadine De Ripainsel, Keisuke Kiri, Ryo Tsuchie, Haruka Tomoeda, Yibei Liu, Midori Hasuike, Minako Suzuki, Marie de France, Andreas Nordström
Structural Engineering: David Glover, with Jon Leach, Tom Webster, Harriet Eldred and Jack Wilshaw, AECOM
Project Directors: Julia Peyton-Jones, with Hans Ulrich Obrist, Serpentine Gallery
Project Leader: Julie Burnell, with Amy Brown and Robertta Marques, Serpentine Gallery
Project Curators: Jochen Volz, with Sophie O’Brien and Rebecca Lewin, Serpentine Gallery
Project Managers: Gareth Stapleton, with Nazma Uddin, Rise
Project Advisors:

  • Lord Palumbo, Chairman, Serpentine Board of Trustees
  • Zaha Hadid, Architect, Serpentine Board of Trustees
  • Colin Buttery, Director of Parks, The Royal Parks
  • Westminster City Council Planning Office
  • Hassan Lashkariani, Building Control, Westminster City Council District Surveyor’s Office
  • Jenny Wilson, Licensing Authority, Westminster City Council
  • London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority
  • London Region, English Heritage
  • Friends of Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens

Construction: Ted Featonby with Mick Mead, Stage One
Consultants: Barnaby Collins and James Penfold, DP9
Sponsores:

  • Sponsores: HP, Hiscox
  • Media Partner: The Independent
  • Platinum Sponsors: Rise, Viabizzuno progettiamo la luce
  • Gold Sponsor: Weil
  • Silver Sponsor: XXL GLASS
  • Bronze Sponsors: DP9, EC Harris, Grangewood, Knight Frank LLP, SABIC, Site Engineering Surveys, Smeg
  • Supports: The Japan Foundation
  • Additional Support: ANA, The Japan Society

Text Description: © Courtesy of Serpentine Gallery, AECOM, Sou Fujimoto
Images: © Ben Stansall, Christian Sinibaldi for Guardian, Laurence Mackman, AECOM, David Crundwell, Valentijn Byvanck, Serpentine Gallery, Alexandra b Almeida, Jim Stephenson, Iwan Baan, Lefteris Pitarakis, Lewis Ronald, Nargess Shahmanesh Banks, Peter Macdiarmid, Ray Tang, Studio Cyrille Thomas, Sou Fujimoto Architects

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[highlight1]  Video  [/highlight1]

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[highlight1]  Location Map  [/highlight1]

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© Nils Vik

Aurland Lookout (Stegastein Viewpoint) / Saunders Architecture & Wilhelmsen Arkitektur

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[highlight1]  Aurland Lookout – Merging buildings and nature  [/highlight1]

[dropcap]A[/dropcap]urland Lookout (Stegastein Viewpoint) stands at 2000 feet height above the sea level, is built by Todd Saunders and Tommie Wihelmsen. It’s one of the most popular attractions in Norway. This project is part of a national program on tourist routes commissioned by the Norwegian Highway Department. A popular sightseeing bus roundtrip from Flåm and Aurland to the spectacular viewpoint Stegastein. Here, approx. 650 meters above the village Aurland and the fjord, you get a fantastic view of the fjord scenery. It’s a perfect place to take your holiday photos. The pictures actually say more than a thousand words.

© Todd Saunders© Todd Saunders

Situated in a remote valley in northwest Norway, the Gudbrandsjuvet platform is part of a project to revamp 18 tourist highways across the country. Norway’s national road agency is spending a staggering £1bn until 2012 on the project and has so far commissioned over 45 architecture and landscaping firms to come up with designs for panoramic viewpoints, picnic spots, rest areas and other installations.

© Todd Saunders© Todd Saunders

  • This spectacular platform towers 640 metres over Aurlandsvangen and juts out in space, providing a panorama view of the vast fjordscape, where the World Heritage Site in Nærøyfjord is also clearly visible. The scenic overlook is also a rest area, offering parking and an airy lavatory structure.
  • The Stegastein Viewpoint is designed and built by Todd Saunders and Tommie Wihelmsen who won the first prize in Norwegian tourist routes competition. It’s one of the most popular attractions in Norway.
  • Stegastein Viewpoint appears as a “V”. The bending part provides the holing power for the whole viewpoint, and the horizontal part is covered with a large piece of glasses to avoid accidents happened. If you are brave enough, you can walk near the furthest point to enjoy the incredible fjord scenery.

© Todd Saunders© Todd Saunders

Some designs are spectacular. A wooden promenade in the Lofoten islands has quirky angles as if it were a sheet of paper that had been crumpled and smoothed. A bright yellow rest house for cyclists, also in the Lofoten, juts from the flatlands where it is set. And then there’s Snøhetta’s Eggum rest area, with public toilets so cool you will never want to leave.

  • “We wanted it to stand out and be very visual,” says Wilhelmsen. “It’s the vision of young architects who wanted to have fun.”

© Todd Saunders© Todd Saunders

Overview:

It consists of a 30 m long ramp that extends into space before curving downward toward the fjord 600 m below. At the platform’s end, an almost invisible glass balustrade heightens the sense of being in midair, creating a mixture of exhilaration and fear that sees many visitors stopping halfway out. The architects chose a strong form yet minimalist concept that sympathises with the immediate environment. Pine trees surround the structure producing the sensation of walking through treetops into the expansive view.

The 4 m wide pine deck is supported by laminated bentwood sides produced in the Netherlands. These cut a strong line through the air before flowing into a seamless downward curve onto steel supporting arms bolted into buried concrete footings. The form and structure of the lookout are combined through the use of laminated timber to create a simple and elegant expression that fits seamlessly into its environment. This amazing structure draws visitors up the mountain, and has become an icon in Norway since its completion.

© Todd Saunders© Todd Saunders

Construction Details:

  • Size of the ramp L x W x H = 33,6m x 4,2m x 13,5m
  • The ramp is constructed with load-bearing galvanized steel, and then covered with environmental pressure treated pine.
  • The load-bearing system is two parallell frames with a rectangular section. There are seven steel sections to make the on-site construction easier.
  • The cross-section has been chosen to take in consideration and are 300m wide and 1100 high, while the the ”legs” of the ramp are a smaller at 300mm x 800mm.
  • The most tension is in the curve of the ramp. A framework in the floor of the ramp criss-crosses from this point all the way to the foundation in the road. The floor of the ramp has an inner construcion og steel trusses with a center distance of 1m.
  • The floor of the ramp is 65mm massive wood, placed with a small fall to each side of the ramp. The floor is screwed from the underside to the steel frame. The ”rails” on the edge of the ramp are covered with 65mm of laminated wood.
  • The wooden joins on the side of the rails are semi-cirle joints that make the joins less visible from a distance. The underside of the ramp is coved in open wooden slats.
  • The ramps has two concrete foundations. The upper foundation deals with most of the side forces from the wind. This foundation is made as a lying ”U” , and nine long tension bolts are fastended to the mountain in go under the road and are fastened with bolts.
  • The second, and lower foundation, is the foundation for the ”legs” of the ramp. This foundation is bolted in two places to the mountain-side.
  • The WC building is constructed of place-formed concrete that form the floor, side-walls, and roof. The concrete is then covered with ”elite-crete” to give a black coating of rubber-like surface. The endwalls are 65mm solild wood. The end wall towards the fjords are mostly glass.

© Todd Saunders© Todd Saunders

Saunders Architecture & Tommie Wilhelmsen Arkitektur

The site is above Aurland, a small town in Sogn og Fjordane, one of the larger fjords on the West Coast of Norway. Aurland is three hours drive from Bergen, Norway’s second largest city. We were one of three architecture firms invited to deliver a design proposal for this site. After winning we worked on detail drawings for the project together with Node Engineers, Bergen. The project was built in Fall 2005 and was officially opened in June 2006.

The place has attracted people from all over the world. We called our competition entry «640m over Aurland and 20120 km from Tokyo», keeping in mind the uniqueness of the place in the bigger picture.

© Todd Saunders© Todd Saunders

The Place – the nature:

Nature first and architecture second was the guiding principal when we sat down to design this project. It was immediately obvious to us that in such beautiful surroundings one must make the least possible encroachment in the existing landscape and terrain. The landscape is so fantastic that it is difficult to improve the place, but at the same time very easy to destroy the atmosphere by inserting too many elements into the site. Even though we have chosen an expressive form, the concept is a form of minimalism, in an attempt to conserve and complement the existing nature.

Organization:

Today there are many people stopping at this site to enjoy the phenomenal views over the fjords. At times the areas gets filled with cars and tour busses. One of the first things we decided to do was to form a small parking area for 2 buses and 10 cars further up the road to help keep the place pure and not to disturb the look out. The construction is a bridge that one can go out onto, as a structure in the air. The structure is 4 m wide, 30 long, and 9m high out at the very end.

© flickr-hsili© flickr-hsili

The Horizon and Dramatization:

To make the situation even more dramatic it was important for us to create the experience of leaving the mountainside. We wanted people to come out in the air. The construction creates a distinct horizon; a bridge in the open room of this large fjord. It is imperative that the landscape and the vegetation not altered, but are protected so that one came come out from the landscape and experience it from new standpoint.

We have managed to behold all of the large pine trees on the site. This allows us to create an interaction between the structure and nature. One can walk out into the air through the treetops, helping dramatise the experience of nature and the larger landscape room.

© Todd Saunders© Todd Saunders

  • The project aims to open up the stunning Norwegian landscape to tourists through a series of architectural viewpoints that enhance their surroundings.
  • The government have worked with an array of talented architects who have taken their inspiration from the surrounding enviroment to create something really special. The structure was designed to pull the viewer away from the roadside and lift them past the trees, allowing for the viewer to be completely surrounded by the panorama of the fjord at Stegastein.
  • The route is currently comprised of 18 selected stretches from north to south of the country, although it is all part of a 15-year project, so we can expect to see more of these amazing structures appearing around Norway.

© flickr-Lewis Martin© flickr-Lewis Martin

[highlight1]  Project Data  [/highlight1]

Project name: Aurland Lookout (Stegastein Viewpoint)
Location: Aurland, Norway
Coordinates: 60.908625,7.211963
Type: Public Facilities, ViewPoint
Materials: Steel and wood
Project Area: 2200 sqm
Construction Year: 2005-2006
Project Year: 2005-2006
Status: Completed
Opening: June 2006
Budget: 17 million Nkr
Completion Year: 2006
[box_note]
Awards:

  • 2013 – Tripadvisor Awards – Ranked No.111 of 562 attractions in Western Norway
  • 2006 – Norwegian Construction Prize Award

[/box_note]

[highlight1]  The people  [/highlight1]

Client / Owner / Developer: Norwegian Public Roads Administration
Architects:

Technical Advisors: Node AS, Bergen
Contractor: Veidekke AS, Sogndal
Road Engineer: Asplan Viak
Structural: Node AS, Bergen
Mechanical: Node AS, Bergen
Electrical: Node AS, Bergen
Landscape: Todd Saunders & Tommie Wilhelmsen
Other specialist consultants: Asplan Viak, road engineers
Text Description: © Courtesy of Saunders Architecture & Wilhelmsen Arkitektur
Images: © Saunders Architecture, Wilhelmsen Arkitektur, Todd Saunders, Nils Vik, flickr-hsili, flickr-Ken Lee, flickr-Lewis Martin, flickr-michelle, flickr-Ryan Litovitch

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[highlight1]  Location Map  [/highlight1]

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© Fogo Island Inn

Fogo Island Inn / Saunders Architecture

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[highlight1]  Fogo Island Inn  [/highlight1]

[dropcap]C[/dropcap]anadian-born, Norway-based architect Todd Saunders returned to Newfoundland to design a 29-room inn on tiny Fogo Island. His client, the nonprofit Shorefast Foundation, employs local craftspeople and workers to establish a new economic base for an “outport” community once dependent on fishing and shipbuilding. The inn combines green-design strategies and vernacular forms to create a dramatic retreat that makes a profound connection to a rugged place.

© Fogo Island Inn© Fogo Island Inn

  • The Fogo Island Inn is the culmination of a major community revitalization project. The building’s rugged minimalist architecture balances traditional influences with a contemporary sensibility, which architect Todd Saunders has made and built just for Fogo.
  • A cultural destination in its own right where visitors and locals meet, the Inn includes an art gallery, heritage library, cinema and rooftop sauna. Each of the 29 guest rooms is unique, with every detail chosen with purpose and handcrafted by locals.

© Fogo Island Inn© Fogo Island Inn

Overview:

The Fogo Island Inn is an architectural gem that was born of Fogo Island, Newfoundland. It is a home for intrepid, curious and discerning high-comfort explorers. Designed and crafted as a cultural and ecological hub, the Inn is a place to experience the old and the new — through the fishery, through art, through architecture and design and through food.

Embracing the emotional resonance and quiet beauty of everyday life in Newfoundland’s outport communities, the Inn is a venue for dialogue between guests and the island’s people, places and things. In this way, it acts as a direct conduit to the culture, traditions and stunning beauty of this most unexpected place at the edge of the world.

All twenty-nine of the Inn’s spacious guest rooms and suites have stunning panoramic views of the North Atlantic from floor-to-ceiling windows. The custom-made king-size beds are designed to be separated into two super twins; all rooms are individually decorated with bespoke locally hand-crafted furnishings and textiles, and most have wood-burning stoves.

Northern European-style wood-fired saunas and hot tubs are located on the roof of the Inn — a perfect place for stargazing and a brilliant way to restore after a long, happy day of adventure on the island.

The Fogo Island Contemporary Art Gallery, the Inn’s fine dining restaurant, lounge and bar, and the Dr. Leslie A. Harris Heritage Library, specializing in literature of the region are all located on the ground floor, while the Fogo Island Cinema, a partnership with the National Film Board of Canada, and the gym are located on the second floor.

© Fogo Island Inn© Fogo Island Inn

Building Features:

  • wood is the primary construction material used, reflecting the vernacular traditions it also leaves a certain respect to the landscape that
  • in many ways holds a much larger significance than any structure built on it could ever have. the massing consists of two oblong
  • rectangular volumes, stacked at a slightly different angle to form an X. this greatly reduces the direct impact on the site while still providing
  • the necessary area without creating a massive construct that sits completely out of scale with the context. the ground floor is reserved for
  • a restaurant led by one of canada’s highest ranked chefs, the main lobby, library, movie theater and independent art gallery, followed by
  • four levels of individual rooms, and a spa and sauna facility on the rooftop enjoying views over the sea and island.

© Fogo Island Inn© Fogo Island Inn

Rooms Features and Services:

  • Each guest room is a contemporary expression of traditional outport design and decor: “handmade modern”
  • Spectacular views of the North Atlantic
  • Floor-to-ceiling windows with swing-open sections
  • Natural wood floors with in-floor heating
  • Exceptional sound proofing
  • Custom made, organic, natural fiber beds
  • Heated towel racks, and heated toilet seats with built in bidet
  • Full wireless, complimented by discreetly hidden technology
  • Custom designed, locally crafted furniture and textiles
  • Wood burning stove featured in many rooms
  • Room amenities include: robes, slippers, books, locally sourced toiletries and an array of creature comforts, all provided with resting, lounging and “being” in mind
  • All suites are offered on a full-board basis, each one includes: daybreak tray, breakfast, dinner (lunch), afternoon tea, snacks, supper and non-alcoholic beverages
  • All gratuities and service charges, excluding the standard 13% HST are included
  • Nightly turn down service and 24 hour room service
  • A completely smoke-free environment
  • Full use of all facilities within the Inn: cinema screenings, sauna, rooftop, hot tubs, contemporary art gallery, gym and heritage library

© Fogo Island Inn© Fogo Island Inn

Geotourism – Jonathan Tourtellot of National Geographic coined the term “geotourism”. In his words, “geotourism is tourism that sustains or enhances the geographical character of a place – the environment, heritage, aesthetics, food, culture and well-being of a local people”. We believe that these geographically and culturally unique islands are extremely well suited to visitors wanting to experience this. We plan to add the necessary infrastructure to catalyze this industry on Fogo Island and Change Islands and to do so in a manner that engages the local people as masters of their own destinies. To support the goal of helping Fogo Island become a leading geotourism destination, Shorefast is creating The Fogo Island Inn.

© Alex Fradkin© Alex Fradkin

  • The Fogo Island Inn is scheduled to open in spring 2013. It is intended to become one of the world’s great rural inns and will be a showcase for local culture as well as being an economic engine for the islands. All of the surpluses from the Fogo Island Inn belong to the Community. The Inn is also intended to be a focal point for social life on the island. In addition to its 29 guest rooms, the Inn will house a gallery, a heritage library named for Dr Leslie Harris, and in partnership with the National Film Board, Canada’s first English language e-cinema.
  • The Fogo Island Inn is designed by Gander native Todd Saunders who has been named one of the world’s top architects under 40. Jim Case of Sheppard Case Architects based in St. John’s, is the managing architect on the project. In addition, a Fogo Island based team of architects and other professionals are dedicated to bringing the Inn to life. The Inn is being built by local carpenters who are bringing their traditional talents and local building techniques to bear on this very contemporary wooden structure.

© Fogo Island Inn© Fogo Island Inn

Sustainable EDGE:

The Fogo Island Inn is a 29-room high-end eco-tourism facility on the island of Fogo, off the north-east coast of Newfoundland. In addition to providing accommodations the Inn will also house a community library and art gallery, an e-cinema and a five-star restaurant. The project is and initiative for community economic development by the Shorefast Foundation, a social enterprise.

A goal of the project was to make the Inn as energy and cost efficient as possible so that maximum revenues could accrue to support the community and be re-invested in “Finding new ways for an old continuity,” as noted by Zita Cobb, founder of Shorefast Foundation.

Sustainable EDGE provided sustainable engineering consulting which included facilitating an Integrated Design Charette, high performance building envelope design and consulting on high-efficiency mechanical systems. Systems include radiant heating from solar thermal and wood boilers, solar domestic hot water for rooms and laundry, displacement ventilation with heat recovery, demand ventilation and summer outdoor air cooling with dehumidified outdoor air and kitchen exhaust air cleaning to avoid cooking odours.

Sustainable EDGE provided green building consulting throughout the project’s design and construction phase.

© Fogo Island Inn© Fogo Island Inn

Saunders Architecture

A five star inn for the Shorefast Foundation on Fogo Island, Newfoundland, Canada. Using wood as the main material, Saunders designed the 29 rooms Fogo Inn as a means towards the island’s economic and cultural survival, but also as a timeless piece of architecture, which would be ‘made just for Fogo’. The Inn includes a restaurant, directed by one of Canada’s best chefs, together with a lobby, a library, a small movie theatre and an independent art gallery on the ground floor; four floors of rooms above ground level; and a sauna and spa facility on the top of the building.

© Fogo Island Inn© Fogo Island Inn

  • The Fogo Island Inn provides us with space to breathe in inspiration and we wanted to share this possibility with our friends. So we created presents that could only be made by us — dream boxes.
  • Each box is handcrafted, unique and made with care by our community. Those who unwrap their gift and peek inside will find a most unexpected space filled with wonder. This is where there is room to dream.
  • The Fogo Island Inn is committed to sustaining local traditions by finding new ways with old things.
  • The Fogo Island Inn is the culmination of a major community revitalization project. The building’s rugged minimalist architecture balances traditional influences with a contemporary sensibility, which architect Todd Saunders says was, “made and built just for Fogo”.

© Fogo Island Inn© Fogo Island Inn

[highlight1]  Project Data  [/highlight1]

Project name: Fogo Island Inn
Location: Fogo Island, Newfoundland A0G 2X0, Canada
Coordinates: 49.730132,-54.17909
Type: Hotel
Size: 29 guest rooms
Project Area: 4,000 sqm
Project Year: 2010-2012
Status: Completed
Opening Date: June 1st, 2013
Cost: $25-million
Completion Year: 2013
Fogo Island Inn’s website: here

[highlight1]  The people  [/highlight1]

Client / Owner / Developer: Shorefast Foundation
Architects: Saunders Architecture – Vestre Torggate 22 5015, Bergen, Norway
Project Team: Todd Saunders with Ryan Jørgensen, Joseph Kellner and Attila Béres
Project Architect: Sheppard Case Architects – 683 Water Street, 2nd Floor, St. John’s, Newfoundland A1E 1B5, Canada
Builder: Shorefast Foundation
Engineer: DBA Consulting Engineers Ltd., and Crosbie Engineering Ltd.
Sustainable Design: Sustainable EDGE
Furniture Designer: Simon Jones
Text Description: © Courtesy of Fogo Island Inn, Sustainable EDGE, Shorefast Foundation
Images: © Saunders Architecture, Fogo Island Inn, Alex Fradkin, Bent René Synnevåg, Shorefast Foundation

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[highlight1]  Video  [/highlight1]

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[highlight1]  Location Map  [/highlight1]

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© Rafael Gamo

La Tallera Siqueiros / Frida Escobedo

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[highlight1]  La Tallera Siqueiros  [/highlight1]

[dropcap]F[/dropcap]rida Escobedo’s intervention in the Tallera Siqueiros creates a relationship which combines a museum-workshop surrounding areas from a simple gesture: open the museum courtyard adjacent to a square turning a series of murals from its original position. It is a space built in 1965 that became the home and studio of muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros in the last years of his life.

© Rafael Gamo© Rafael Gamo

  • La Tallera Siqueiros aims to recover the cultural role of the legendary site, which during the late 1960s and early 1970s was home to the late Mexican muralist and political activist David Alfaro Siqueiros (1896-1974), by turning it into an active “museum, workshop, artist residency and meeting point for the production and criticism of art”

© Public Domain© Public Domain

La Tallera, one of the major studies of Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros, opened its doors after extensive renovations with the goal of becoming the pioneer of artistic production center specializing in art modern and contemporary. During the inauguration in Cuernavaca in the central state of Morelos, President Felipe Calderon recalled that, besides being one of the greatest artists of Mexico and the world, was a precursor Siqueiros mural that emerged from of the Revolution and of the search for the Mexican. Siqueiros (1896-1974) “is one of the greatest exponents of Mexican art. Given their importance we decided to remodel several spaces which ceased after his death, including Tallera, who was completely neglected, “said the president. The center, which opened its doors to the exhibition “The Tallera. A factory in motion” and “Who was Siqueiros. 1896-1932″ will be focused to produce, discuss and question the artistic production contemporary, said the director of the site, Taiyana Pimentel.

© Rafael Gamo© Rafael Gamo

Though architectural remodeling “La Tallera. Siqueiros Project” is completely finished, still need to organize and implement various activities taking place in the center. “Our idea is in three stages enable the Tallera very fast. At first, the area of exhibitions and educational workshops, then we take care of the documentation and library area, and finally, the international residential project “he said. Beside her, the director of the National Institute of Fine Arts (INBA), Teresa Vicencio said it was two years and six months of rehabilitation, then found the house workshop “deteriorated into a sort of abandonment, and had to do major maintenance repairs on all modules. ” Donated by the artist after his death in 1974 and neglected for several years, the site aims to become a pioneer of art to become a museum, workshop, international residencies place for both artists and curators, and point meeting for the production and criticism. remodeling, which began in 2009, was made ​​from the architect’s proposal Frida Escobedo, the draft raised an institutional model that prioritizes the workshop and experimentation as fundamental in artistic production.

© Public Domain© Public Domain

Design Features:

  • The two murals by Siqueiros, together with a third, were originally situated in the courtyard of his atelier/ home. Escobedo turned the court into a square.

© Rafael Gamo© Rafael Gamo

  • Frida Escobedo uses materials and colours to identify the different parts of the museum: the pre-existing structure, with the main exhibition gallery, is painted white, while the added parts are in bare concrete.

© Rafael Gamo© Rafael Gamo

  • A geometric concrete grid composed of triangles clads parts of the museum, the initial core of which was built in 1965 by Siqueiros. As he once said, La Tallera Siqueiros is “an idea that Diego Rivera and I had in the 1920s: a workshop in which to practise and teach everybody the technique of murals”

© Rafael Gamo© Rafael Gamo

  • Besides providing a visual link to the square, the murals mark the volume that houses the cafeteria on the right and, on the left, the archives and library block.

© Rafael Gamo© Rafael Gamo

  • The concrete pattern that envelops the main structure creates an uncertain border between interior and exterior.

© Rafael Gamo© Rafael Gamo

Frida Escobedo

Through one single gesture –opening the museum’s courtyard to the plaza by rotating Siqueiros murals from their original position– the proposal for “La Tallera” generates a new relationship between the museum/atelier and its surrounding spaces. With this simple operation, the symbolic elements of the façade play a new role in the architectural syntaxes of the building, engaging the visitor in a new relationship with the museum.

As the courtyard opens towards the street, “La Tallera” gives ground to the public space, while integrating the adjacent plaza as an extension of the complex. The murals will now work in two ways: first, as a visual and programmatic link with the plaza, by containing the public areas of the museum, such as the cafeteria and the library; and secondly, as a “programmatic wall”, that divides the museum/atelier and the living quarters.

The proposal was presented through an interactive model/board that unfolds unto a series of informative panels that can be displayed in multiple readings, enhancing the project’s underlying concept: an unfolding sequence that generates new spatial links and relations.

© Rafael Gamo© Rafael Gamo

About – David Alfaro Siquerios (1896 – 1974)

David Alfaro Siquerios was by far the most politically active of the three Mexican muralists. He was a sophisticated political ideologist who was involved in the political conflicts of the Mexican Revolution serving as a protestor, demonstrator, and soldier. His radical political beliefs eventually got him expelled from Mexico. He spent many years in jail for his actions and this influenced his art greatly. Siquerios often painted the sufferings of prison life. He too attended the San Carlos Academy, impressively he was admitted at the young age of 15. His travels to Europe brought him in contact with the artwork of Goya. The themes and images of war in their works are very similar. Classical art, Italian Renaissance art, and Italian Futurism also influenced him greatly. Siquerios believed that “art must no longer be the expression of individual satisfaction (which) it is today, but should aim to become a fighting educative art for all.”

Murals of David Alfaro Siquerios:

The Proletarian Victim expresses the personal impact that social oppression has on the human. The ropes binding the body symbolize the oppressive government and upper class over the peasants. The title also shows his class-conciousness. His most famous painting was Echo of a Scream. This piece was inspired by his experiences during active combat and his observations of suffering. By illustrating a baby, this piece emphasizes the internal suffering of the innocent victims of the Revolution. New Democracy depicts a woman who is trying to shatter the bonds of oppression and exploitation. She is shown carrying a torch of freedom to symbolize the new order. He includes strong visions of the future, similar to Rivera. Classical influence is shown in his approach to idealize human body form. Sometimes he exaggerates with expressive emotion, similar to Diego Rivera. With his death came an end to a great movement in modern art.

© public domain© public domain

[highlight1]  Project Data  [/highlight1]

Project name: La Tallera Siqueiros
Location: Venus 52, Jardines de Cuernavaca, 62360 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México
Coordinates: 18.932242,-99.204998
Type: Adaptive Reuse, Gallery
Program: recovery makes this space a pioneer of its kind to be established as a museum, workshop, room for artistic residencies and a meeting point for the production and art criticism
Specific Use of Building: Gallary and Exhibition Space of muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros
Project Year: 2010-2011
Status: Completed
Budget: 27 million pesos

  • 600 000 pesos in remodeling
  • 15 million dollars in restoration of murals
  • 3 million in lighting and work

Completion Year: September 2012

[highlight1]  The people  [/highlight1]

Client / Owner / Developer: n/a
Architects: Frida Escobedo – México City, México
Conceptual Proposal: Frida Escobedo, Rodolfo Díaz Cervantes
Design team: Frida Escobedo, Adiranne Montemayor, Adrian Moreau, Daniela Barrera, Fernando Cabrera, Luis Arturo García Castro.
Graphic: Adrian Moreau, Rodolfo Díaz Cervantes, Rick Rossenham
Consulting: BulAu (Carlos Coronel, Hector de la Peña)
Structural Engineering: Edificación Integral (Carlos Caballero Ortíz) / Omar Laguna Campo
Landscape: Entorno Arquitectura de Paisaje (Hugo Sánchez, Tonatiuh Martínez)
Text Description: © Courtesy of Frida Escobedo, domusweb
Images: © Frida Escobedo, Rafael Gamo

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[highlight1]  Video  [/highlight1]

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[highlight1]  Location Map  [/highlight1]

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The Surroundings - © Dedon Island Resort

Dedon Island Resort / Jean-Marie Massaud & Daniel Pouzet

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[highlight1]  Dedon Island Resort  [/highlight1]

[dropcap]C[/dropcap]reated in collaboration with celebrated designers Jean-Marie Massaud and Daniel Pouzet, the villas, pavilions, pagodas and lounges of DEDON ISLAND are the perfect expression of our ideal of barefoot luxury. Utilizing only local materials and local craftsmanship, integrating seamlessly with the surroundings, dissolving the boundaries between indoors and out, embracing traditional architectural style while thoughtfully incorporating the finest modern amenities.

  • DEDON ISLAND was designed to bring you back in touch with yourself. No money is used here, no checks signed. Food, drink, massages and a vast array of activities and services are simply available to you, when and as you desire. More than just a hotel! A palmfringed paradise, naturally sheltered from the raw tropical wilderness all around it. It’s a place for adventures, a place in nature where ultimate outdoor luxury can be experienced.

The Surroundings - © Dedon Island ResortThe Surroundings – © Dedon Island Resort

From taking a massage to lounging at the bar to dipping into the infinity pool to swaying in a Nestrest, watching the ocean change color before your eyes, there’s plenty to do without ever leaving the resort (at night, there’s even an outdoor cinema, with movies screened among the coconut trees as guests relax in the pool). For those seeking a bit more action, there’s also sailing, kayaking and stand-up paddling, all from the DEDON ISLAND beachfront or mangroves. Arrange a boat and go island-hopping, snorkeling, waterskiing, knee-boarding or exploring the majestic coves of Suhoton. For surfers, everything from the perfect beginners’ wave to legendary Cloud 9 is within 30 minutes of the resort. Diving? Deep-sea fishing? It can all be arranged, and much, much more.

  • “The idea is a little like that of a youth hostel,” says Bobby Dekeyser (the founder of Dedon), “only more exclusive. We all travel so much and experience so much, but in the end, what really sticks in our heads is the people and the atmospheres, and youth hostels are great for that. At DEDON Places, as in a hostel, people will be able to share an experience, take part in something together – for example, going out fishing, then coming back and cooking with a fantastic chef. So this is for people who want to push themselves a little farther, to go beyond the typical luxury experience. It’s a give as well as a take. And we already have plenty of bookings, just on the strength of the idea.”

The Surroundings - © Dedon Island ResortThe Surroundings – © Dedon Island Resort 

Accommodation:

  • Deluxe Villa – Generously sized two-story accommodation featuring kingsize bed on ground floor and two lounge niches that convert to single beds; generous, luxuriously appointed master bathroom; kingsize bed on first floor and one lounge niche that converts to a single bed; fans and air-conditioning; glass front façade for full ocean views; private porch; outdoor shower.
  • Superior Family Villa – Amply sized two-bedroom accommodation featuring kingsize bed in first bedroom and two lounge niches that convert to single beds; kingsize bed in second bedroom with one lounge niche that converts to a single bed; generous, luxuriously appointed bathroom; fans and air-conditioning; private porch; ocean views.
  • Superior Villa – Amply sized one-bedroom accommodation featuring kingsize bed and two lounge niches that convert to single beds; ample, luxuriously appointed bathroom; fans and air-conditioning; garden views; private porch; outdoor shower.

The Village - © Dedon Island ResortThe Village – © Dedon Island Resort 

Architectural & Design features:

The Resort:

  • The iconic DEDON ISLAND Pagoda, which marks the resort’s place along the coastline, is easily reached by paddle board, kayak or a light swim.
  • The DEDON ISLAND reception lounge pavilion combines local architectural influences with a pared down, contemporary design sensibility.
  • The open-air reception lounge features a sunken conversation pit, a fireplace, specially designed bamboo lamps and beaded gauze curtains.
  • The circular bar features a complex weaving pattern executed by DEDON’s master weavers. It looks especially dramatic when lit up at night.
  • The DEDON ISLAND library is located in the same pavilion as the bar. It consists of three bookshelf-lined boxes that are connected by hinges.
  • All architecture in the resort makes use of sustainable local materials, including woven coconut leaf roofing, carved yakal wood and bamboo.

The Village - © Dedon Island ResortThe Village – © Dedon Island Resort 

The Villas:

  • The DEDON ISLAND villas are characterized by peaked and sweeping rooflines. Some are two-story accommodations with additional sleeping above.
  • Surrounded by tropical gardens, all villas have their own private porches and are designed to emphasize the continuity between indoors and out.
  • The villas feature numerous resting and lounging areas, with plenty of cushions. Decor is spare yet warm and inviting, sophisticated yet cosy.
  • Carved panels enfold king-size beds, sealed off by specially designed mosquito netting. All rooms feature ceiling fans and air conditioning.
  • Villa interiors integrate local craftsmanship and materials. Niches serve as work or resting spaces while converting easily into extra beds.
  • Villa bathrooms are generously sized, thoughtfully designed and luxuriously appointed with the highest-quality modern fixtures and finishings.
  • Bathrooms feature luxurious, high-pressure showers with sunken flooring made of local stone. Benches are made of raw, hand-carved local wood.
  • Stone sinks sit atop raw wood tables. Wood shutters blur the distinction between outside and in. Organic, local soaps and shampoos are supplied.

The Villas - © Dedon Island ResortThe Villas – © Dedon Island Resort 

Children’s Village:

  • A series of elevated woven domes, connected by a wooden platform, enclose trampolines and hidden, shaded spaces. Perfect for kids of all ages.
  • Specially designed children’s swings and high chairs ensure that the little ones are safe and secure, and always feel a part of the action.
  • Created by resort co-designer Daniel Pouzet, the children’s furniture reflects DEDON ISLAND’s role as a place to test new products and ideas.

The Village - © Dedon Island ResortThe Village – © Dedon Island Resort

Furniture & Products

  • All furnishings, including this carved coconut wood table, have been created exclusively for DEDON ISLAND using local techniques and materials.
  • The resort doubles as DEDON’s own outdoor living lab, a place to invent, test and experiment with all kinds of new products and ideas.
  • Bamboo lights, which come in hanging or standing version, represent the marriage of modern design and timeless, local materials.
  • Innovative outdoor shower screens, each containing their own planters, give privacy while showing off the skills of DEDON’s master weavers.

detail 02 - © Jean-Marie Massaud & Daniel Pouzetdetail 02 – © Jean-Marie Massaud & Daniel Pouzet 

Dedon

DEDON has always been about more than outdoor furniture. From the beginning, it has been about people coming together in unique environments and special atmospheres to engage in dialogue, exchanges and unforgettable shared experiences. And with our newest venture, DEDON Places, we’re bringing this bigger idea of DEDON fully to life.

DEDON Places is a budding collection of one-of-a-kind accommodations around the world, each with its own outdoor orientation, from ski chalet to island hideaway, African wilderness lodge, tree house, igloo, boat or city harbor hotel. In many ways, these accommodations are a reflection our company’s nomadic spirit. “Because we’re always on the move,” says Bobby, “meeting up with partners, team members and friends in so many different parts of the world, we’re always discovering incredible places. Now we want to let others know about them and share the experience, too.”

The Villas - © Dedon Island Resort© Dedon Island Resort

Enjoying life outdoors, together with family and friends — for us at DEDON, it’s the ultimate luxury. We’d never put our shoes on again if we didn’t have to. Maybe that’s why we created DEDON ISLAND.

More than just a hotel, DEDON ISLAND is a kind of a laboratory for us – an Outdoor Living Lab to bring our dreams of barefoot luxury to life. Every experiment we carry out here, from groundbreaking design to organic local farming, leads us that much closer to achieving our vision of a truly sustainable paradise — a place to retreat, rejuvenate and return to the world in a barefoot state of mind.

The Village - © Dedon Island Resort© Dedon Island Resort 

The island at the edge of the world:

There are more than 7,000 islands in the Philippine Archipelago, but there’s nowhere else on Earth like DEDON ISLAND. This unique resort is located on the southeastern tip of reef-ringed Siargao, one of the last islands of the Asian continent. Blessed with lush tropical jungles, white-sanded beaches and countless surfing breaks, including the world-famous Cloud 9 barreling wave, magical Siargao lies just a few kilometers west of the Philippine Deep, a 1,300km-long trench containing the third deepest point on Earth, not to mention some of the world’s greatest deep-sea fishing.

Nestled between ancient mangrove forests and the white sands and crystal waters of its own peaceful bay, shaded by groves of coconut trees and scented by the extravagant flowers blooming in its tropical gardens, the DEDON ISLAND resort is a world unto itself, a barefoot oasis, naturally sheltered from the raw tropical wilderness all around. Viewed from above, it has the look of a village existing outside of time, a place where nature, architecture and design come together in exquisite harmony. A place where the mind empties and the soul refills as you reconnect with the rhythms of the natural world.

The Village - © Dedon Island ResortThe Village – © Dedon Island Resort

DEDON has always been about more than outdoor furniture. From the beginning, it has been about people coming together in unique environments and special atmospheres to engage in dialogue, exchanges and unforgettable shared experiences. And with our newest venture, DEDON Places, we’re bringing this bigger idea of DEDON fully to life.

DEDON Places is a budding collection of one-of-a-kind accommodations around the world, each with its own outdoor orientation, from ski chalet to island hideaway, African wilderness lodge, tree house, igloo, boat or city harbor hotel. In many ways, these accommodations are a reflection our company’s nomadic spirit. “Because we’re always on the move,” says Bobby, “meeting up with partners, team members and friends in so many different parts of the world, we’re always discovering incredible places. Now we want to let others know about them and share the experience, too.”

The Village - © Dedon Island ResortThe Village – © Dedon Island Resort

DEDON Island Resort on Siargao Island in the Philippines. Remote and exotic, with clear blue waters and lush tropical flora, it’s a destination we’ve been visiting for a decade. Having acquired it earlier this year, a group of 30 of us, including the celebrated designer and DEDON collaborator Jean-Marie Massaud, his architectural partner Daniel Pouzet, and their families, spent 14 days living on the island. Based on our shared experience there, Jean-Marie and Daniel are adapting the property to match perfectly with the vision of DEDON Places.

More DEDON Places are in the planning stages, but as Bobby maintains, this is an organic process, and there’s “no pressure” to rush them out. “These are personal places where we all love to go, places where we can continue to tell a story, and it’s important never to lose the fun.” Bookings for DEDON Places will be handled by the DEDON travel agency, and those who are interested in sharing the experience will be able to find out more about it at our upcoming DEDON concept stores, which will feature full travel services.

sketch idea - © Jean-Marie Massaud & Daniel Pouzetsketch idea – © Jean-Marie Massaud & Daniel Pouzet

  • Take off your shoes. On the edge of the pristine waters of the Pacific, from the white sands and rainforest of Siargao Island, Philippines, the new resort Dedon Island is the face of German designer furniture for outdoor that gives it its name. Paradise outdoor thought to relax with family or friends, their philosophy is to generate the mood of barefoot luxury (luxury bare feet).
[highlight1]  Project Data  [/highlight1]

Project name: Dedon Island Resort
Location: Siargao Island, Dapa, Surigao del Norte, Caraga, Philippines
Coordinates: 9.757636,126.122963
Type: Resort, Resort Interior
Materials: local materials and local craftsmanship
Units: 9 Luxury villas
Room Rate: $480-720/night
Project Year: 2009-2011
Status: Completed
Completion Year: 2011
[box_note]
Awards:

  • 2013 Condé Nast Traveller Magazine Awards – Hot List
  • 2013 Tripadvisor Awards – Ranked No.5 of 22 in Siargao Island

[/box_note]
Visit Dedon Island Resort’s website:  here

[highlight1]  The people  [/highlight1]

Client / Owner / Developer: Dedon
Architects: Jean-Marie Massaud & Daniel Pouzet – 7 rue tolain 75020 paris, france
Furniture & Products: Dedon
Text Description: © Courtesy of Dedon
Images: © Dedon Island Resort, Jean-Marie Massaud, Daniel Pouzet

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[highlight1]  Location Map  [/highlight1]

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© David Cervera

Gran Museo del Mundo Maya / 4A Arquitectos

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[highlight1]  Gran Museo del Mundo Maya  [/highlight1]

[dropcap]T[/dropcap]he Gran Museo del Mundo Maya (Great Mayan Culture Museum) is a museum located in the city of Merida , Yucatan in Mexico . It has four permanent exhibition rooms, multimedia rooms and a screening room for documentaries, all related to the Mayan culture. The museum is located at the beginning of the road from Mérida to the port of Progreso , next to the Convention Center Yucatan Siglo XXI where industrial complex was Cordemex.

© David Cervera© David Cervera

In the Maya World Grand Museum public visitors will find a dynamic and interactive museology designed to understand, live and feel the archeology, anthropology, ethnology, history and customs of the land of the Mayab . It is the first in the country to make available reviews of the exhibition in three languages: Mayan, Spanish and English , in addition to any specific language guides and immersive rooms. has four permanent galleries and one temporal and a botanical garden, film screening room HDTV, child care area, cafe, restaurant, shop and parking.

© David Cervera© David Cervera

A building without significance is a simple construction. This led us to search in cosmogony, the general design concept and to interpret that in a sense, ours is a culture that has flourished in the Ceiba’s shadow. The Ceiba as the sacred tree that connects the world with the underworld and the sky and the shadow as an ineffable value in a land scorched by the sun but cooled by the breeze.

© David Cervera© David Cervera

The Museum welcomes to all, encouraging their participation and inviting them to tour and live a great experience in knowledge of Mayan culture and its origins; and most importantly, making us aware of the great development potential that have their descendants, and not has limits; as well as the Ceiba tree refers to the infinite and its branches reach to heaven.

© Rocio Rojo© Rocio Rojo

All spaces of the Museum are designed to captivate and inspire love to visitors, provide them a new knowledge and will leave them with the feeling, curiosity and need to come back again. The spaces will be in constantly evolving, we will always find something new, it will be a live museum.

© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya

Festures:

  • Taking as reference the great figure aesthetics of La Ceiba, the sacred tree of the Maya, the winner of the architectural project team established the parameters for the design of a building to become a cultural landmark in the city of Merida.
  • The Yucatan museums of the future can not remain isolated small efforts, as it runs the risk that the exhibits and interpretation of the great themes of our history and culture from being bounded by the situational circumstances. The Maya World Grand Museum occupies the mission articulating and promoting the generation of a network of museums that serve as a model approach for the various museums museological Peninsula.
  • The Maya World Grand Museum strengthens the integrated vision and generates the projection of our state as a bulwark in the preservation, conservation and promotion of cultural heritage.
  • Museums are increasingly visited by domestic and foreign audiences you want to know and appreciate the expressions of cultural diversity best display settings.
  • The Grand Mayan World Museum is attending the demand for knowledge and appreciation of cultural heritage Yucatan, through multisensory museum communication. It has permanent galleries and temporary exhibitions qualifying for the loan of international collections.
  • Installing a film projection room strengthens its educational outreach and sustainability improves conditions of space.

© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya

XYZ Technologie Culturelle – Permanent multimedia installation:

The exterior façade of the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya comes to life at night, revealing a gigantic fresco of sound and movement. This multimedia experience complements the Museum’s permanent exhibit, which presents the Maya civilization as a continually evolving living culture with an influence that extends to the present day. Sixteen high-definition projectors bring to life the top portion of the Museum’s façade with a virtual band of 34 giant works made up of drawings, photographs and graphic compositions (a Xavier de Richemont creation). A long-range sound system built in to the building’s architecture broadcasts music over the whole site. The entire system can be controlled and programmed remotely.

Permanent multimedia installation 03 - © XYZ Technologie CulturellePermanent multimedia installation 03 – © XYZ Technologie Culturelle

The distinct design of the Museum façade, made of interwoven metallic ribbons, brings to mind the trunk and foliage of the ceiba tree, which was sacred to the Maya. Seventy LED projectors were installed to showcase the building’s unique architecture. At night, this dynamic lighting system recreates the movement of the foliage in the wind.

Permanent multimedia installation 08 - © XYZ Technologie Culturelle

4A Arquitectos

The Gran Museo del Mundo Maya is a building with a contemporary expression about what the Mayans worshiped rather than the Mayans built, in this search we found a recurrent symbol, a key element in the cosmic vision of Mayan Culture: Ceiba, the sacred tree, whose roots penetrates and conforms the underworld, the trunk’s level lays down where life and daily activities take place underneath the shade of its frond which spreads its branches up to the sky and human transcendence.

With this concept of the world’s creation up from three stones and the Ceiba tree, we present the architectural design integrating the program needs and required spaces for the different functional activities, the structural design concept that gives physical bearing to the building and to the other infraestructure engineerings shared out for nurturing and supporting all the museum’s areas. Museum collections, transit cellars, research and study áreas of the great archaeological acquisition and a 260 parking spaces area is located at the “Ceiba’s roots” level.

At the “Ceiba’s trunk” level, up the perron, the main lobby, ticket offices, personal belongins kept area, 2,000 m2 of permanent exhibition rooms and 600 m2 for travelling exhibitions, public relations office, childcare center, restaurant with terrace , souvenir shop and a terrace bar. Executive and administrative offices are located inside the “Ceiba’s frond”, so are the high-definition large format cinema which includes performing arts facilites for various artistic and cultural activities as well as the multi-purpose hall. We understand sustainability as an integral part of any project and in this meaning the aspects considered are:

© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya

Environment:

Located at the heart of an important urban subcenter at north of Merida, the design raises seeking for natural air and light using passive systems to achieve energy benefits and environmental comfort. The main lobby covered and shaded by “La Ceiba” which holds a hollow core, joints the different floors of the building.

© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya

Society:

We designed a comprehensive museum, pretending to make suitable every space to every user: a twined ramp at the perron, a sidewalk-level elevator and another one in the parking lot, to yield universal access with equal dignity, Braille signaling, all facilities in corridors and restrooms for the elderly or handicapped people, rest areas while taking the tour, spaces for workers to improve their life quality, machinery and equipment rooms designed for both, machines and people who operate them, bestowing to workers the same importance as visitors.

© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya

Economy:

Significant economic rationality guidelines were followed, displayed in the design of functional spaces with direct use of passive systems and the selection of materials and building systems that privileged participation of local and regional companies and their employees; and the optimization in infraestructure engineerings projects to achieve the best use of resources for the operation and maintenance.

© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya© Gran Museo del Mundo Maya

  • The city of Merida has a lot of museums and cultural centers, all of them of great historical value and much interest to visitors. And one of the highlights is the Great Museum of the Mayan World, because there you can see hundreds of objects of this culture and learn a lot about archeology, anthropology and history but in a very modern and with the latest technology. Visit this great attraction of Merida and enjoy their interesting exhibitions, its great restaurant, its theaters and obviously its modernity and high technology.

render 01 - © 4A Arquitectos, Gran Museo del Mundo Mayarender 01 – © 4A Arquitectos, Gran Museo del Mundo Maya

[highlight1]  Project Data  [/highlight1]

Project name: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Location: Calle 60 Norte Ex Cordemex, 97110 Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico
Coordinates: 21.034659,-89.628387
Type: Cultural Center, Museum
Specific Use of Building: History Mayan Culture Museum
Total floor area: 22,600 sqm
National Competitive Bidding: 2009
Planning Year: 2010
Construction Year: 2011-2012
Opening: December 21, 2012
Status: Completed
Completion Year: 2012
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Awards:

  • 2013 Consejo Iberoamericano de Diseñadores de Interiores (CIDI) Award – CIDI Premio Iberoamericano – Category: Culture – Emblematic Buildings
  • 2012 Partnerships Awards – Category: Best Pathfinder Project – Winner

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Visit Gran Museo del Mundo Maya’s website:  here

[highlight1]  The people  [/highlight1]

Client / Owner / Developer: n/a
Architects:4A Arquitectos – Calle 38 No. 191 Col. Buenavista, C.P. 97137, Mérida, Yucatán, México
Design: Ricardo Combaluzier, Enrique Duarte, William Ramírez, Josefina Rivas
Lighting design: Lightemotion and XYZ Technologie Culturelle
Permanent multimedia installation:

  • Direction: XYZ Technologie Culturelle – 642 de COurcelle PH-5, Montreal, QC H4C 3C5, Canada
  • Spectacle multimédia: XYZ Technologie Culturelle
  • Production: Yaxché
  • Conception: Xavier De Richemont, video painter
  • Project manager: Carlos Puente
  • Contractor: Hermes

Text Description: © Courtesy of 4A Arquitectos, Gran Museo del Mundo Maya, XYZ Technologie Culturelle
Images: © Gran Museo del Mundo Maya, 4A Arquitectos, Alessandra Ortíz, David Cervera, XYZ Technologie Culturelle

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[highlight1]  Video  [/highlight1]

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[highlight1]  Location Map  [/highlight1]

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© Luc Boegly

La Luciole Concert Hall / Jacques Moussafir Architectes

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[highlight1]  La Luciole Concert Hall  [/highlight1]

[dropcap]T[/dropcap]he La Luciole Concert Hall in Alençon, France designed by Jacques Moussafir Architectes, Despite the fact that it could only host an audience of 250, the unique Luciole has carved itself a powerful regional identity thanks to good quality programming and the way this concert venue brought audiences closer to artists.

© Luc Boegly© Luc Boegly

Situated on the edge of Alençon, in the rural landscape of lower Normandy, the venue resulted from the efforts of a passionate man who has and continues to serve as its director for almost two decades. Founded in 1994, this concert facility has carved itself a reputation, attracting renowned musicians to its tiny performance hall. Several years ago, the municipality agreed to finance the extension of La Luciole.

© Luc Boegly© Luc Boegly

The competition brief required a larger concert hall that would maintain the sense of intimacy and the enveloping quality that defined the original space. The desire to bring people as close to the stage as possible has literally shaped the restructured venue, wherein artists are almost surrounded by their audience. Structurally, the project consists of two cylindrical steel frames and a concrete enclosure for the stage (smaller concrete boxes are also used for entrances and exits.)

© Luc Boegly© Luc Boegly

An arch emerging where the two cylinders intersect marks the border between the stage and the audience. simple in itself, the steel structure required some serious development work as the architects aimed to minimize the use of materials without compromising stability. The evolution of the forms shifted from rectangular to cylindrical, yet the core idea – two tilted, interconnected volumes containing the audience and the stage – remained intact. Of the work.

  • “It’s somewhat bizarre, and eccentric, and very different from everything else designed by our office.” – architect Jacques Moussafir says

© Luc Boegly© Luc Boegly

Jacques Moussafir Architectes

Although it could only host an audience of 250, the original Luciole has carved itself a strong regional identity thanks to quality programming and the way this concert venue brought audiences closer to artists.

The competition brief required that this friendly and intimate atmosphere were recreated in the new auditorium for 650 people, which was why we opted for enveloping, circular forms. Comprised of two tilted cylinders whose intersection forms an elliptical arc between the audience and the stage, the new Luciole acts as an urban beacon in counterpoint to the linear façade of the adjacent exhibition center – a response to the local council’s desire for a powerful signal marking the town’s western sector. Its circular roofs transcribe the venue’s ellipse-shaped logo on a monumental scale.

© Jacques Moussafir Architectes© Jacques Moussafir Architectes

The new concert facility is above all a non-referential design, a minimalist object emerging from the ground, a geyser linking earth and sky. By day, the building’s metal cladding in different shades of blue echoes the fleeing clouds in the Normandy sky. By night, the circular canvas stretched over the sloped auditorium roof can serve as a projection screen for images generated by the musical pulse coming from inside the Luciole.

© Luc Boegly© Luc Boegly

[highlight1]  Project Data  [/highlight1]

Project name: La Luciole Concert Hall
Location: 171 Rue de Bretagne, 61000 Alençon, France
Coordinates: 48.432404,0.067511
Type:  Dance / Music Center
Specific Use of Building: Concert Hall
Progam: Extension – reception room, 650 seats, offices, technical rooms. Renovation bar, rehearsal studio, dressing
Materials: colored cast concrete, steel structure, cladding steel with ribbed Haironville, plasterboard, polycarbonate sheets in Everlite Danpalon of wood + wool Fibracoustic panels, exterior joinery lacquered aluminum, concrete pavements surfaced, wooden on beams
Project Area: 1,274 sqm
Project Year: 2004-2008
Status: Built
Budget: € 2,653,000 ex tax
Completion Year: 2008

[highlight1]  The people  [/highlight1]

Client / Owner / Developer: Alençon city council
Architects: Jacques Moussafir Architectes – 5/7, rue d’Hauteville, 75010 Paris, France
Project Architect:Tetsuya Nakazono
Project Team: Jacques Moussafir with Francesca De Marchi, Nicolas Hugoo, Alexis Duquennoy, Guillaume Cournut, Laurent Théaux and Albert Ruiz
Engineering Partners: A&T (stage designers), Peutz (acoustic designers), Batiserf (structural engineers), Alto (mechanical engineers), René Micout (quantity surveyor)
Contractors: Sagir (concrete structure), Renaudat (metal frameworks), Arblade (roofing & siding), Vonthron (electricity), Gondouin (waterproofing), Ates (partitions and lining), Daupley (exterior woodwork), R2C (metalwork), Polybat (paintwork), AMG Fechoz (stage machinery), Bezannier (wooden stage flooring), Ducré (HVAC and plumbing), Fabripose (interior woodwork), Qualiprofil (suspended ceilings), Assisesportive (seating), Audiotechniques (stage electrics), Azur Scénic (stage fabrics), Thyssen (elevator), Gagneux Décors (flooring)
Text Description: © Courtesy of  Jacques Moussafir Architectes
Images: © Jacques Moussafir Architectes, Luc Boegly

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[highlight1]  Location Map  [/highlight1]

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© Scott Burrows

Barcaldine Tree of Knowledge Memorial / Brian Hooper Architect and M3 architecture

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[highlight1]  Barcaldine Tree of Knowledge Memorial  [/highlight1]

[dropcap]B[/dropcap]risbane based architecture practice m3architecture, in association with Brian Hooper Architect, have completed a £3 million memorial project for the Tree of Knowledge. A 10-metre, 150-year-old Ghost Gum, opposite the hotel in the centre of Barcaldine in Central West Queensland, symbolised an important time in Australia’s political development as the meeting place for shearers during their unsuccessful strike of 1891.

© Scott Burrows© Scott Burrows

The site of the 150 year old, 10 metre Ghost Gum is located on Oak Street in the centre of Barcaldine. The tree was used as a meeting place for shearers during the Great Shearers’ Strike in 1981 and became a symbol of the formation of the Australian Labor Party which was born out of that industrial dispute and the 1890 maritime strike. The Tree of Knowledge was included in the National Heritage List in early 2006 but was poisoned later in the year. The tree did not recover but a memorial was opened at the site in 2009. The monument, which features more than 3,600 suspended timbers to recreate the canopy, is an award-winning piece of architecture.

© Scott Burrows© Scott Burrows

The design forms an 18 metre high steel and timber structure that follows the canopy, in relief, of the old ghost gum tree using 3,600 individual hanging timber slats. From afar the memorial seems to form a suspended slatted container that surrounds the remaining branches of the original tree; only once visitors stand under the structure do they become aware of the canopy that the individual slats form.

  • Michael Lavery of m3architecture explains: “The design was inspired by the way people create and relive memories. The external timbers are charcoaled to create a veil around the memorial space. This finish and its form reference a place of memory and mourning. The ‘veil’ provides hints to the form and movement inside but it does not fully reveal the impact of this space. This experience is saved for visitors as they enter the shade of the ‘tree’.”

© Scott Burrows© Scott Burrows

About – The Tree :

The Tree of Knowledge at Barcaldine is perhaps Australia’s most famous tree. From early settlement days this majestic ghost gum, a Eucalyptus Papuana, attracted special attention becoming popular as a community meeting place. The tree was first known as the ‘Alleluia Tree’, so called because local members of the Salvation Army congregated to worship under its branches. Bullock drivers who were constantly on the move throughout Western Queensland also used the tree as place to gather and swap yarns and news from along the trails.

© Brian Hooper Architect© Brian Hooper Architect

However, the tree gained its enduring status as a historical landmark in May 1891, when Barcaldine became the centre for the ‘Great Shearers’ Strike’. Numbers vary, but it is thought that up to 3,000 striking shearers unified under the rebel ‘Eureka’ flag, to protest against poor working conditions and low wages. Thirteen of their leaders were subsequently arrested and sentenced to three-year terms of imprisonment. From this tumultuous period came the beginnings of what is now the Australian Labor Party.

© Scott Burrows© Scott Burrows

There were no organised political parties in those days. Instead, politically-minded citizens formed alliances on different issues as they arose. The Labor Party changed this by forcing non-Labor politicians to form political parties to oppose it. The Australian Labor Party was the nation’s first political party and is one of the oldest political parties in the western world.

The stated aim of the monument was to:

  • “Honour the men and women of the Labour movement who congregated in this area and, through their courage, determination and dedication to the principles, ideals and objectives of the labour movement, played a leading role in the formation of the Labor Party and further spearheaded the many reforms that resulted in the vastly improved way of life for the Australian people generally.”

© Scott Burrows© Scott Burrows

M3 architecture

Barcaldine’s Tree of Knowledge Memorial re-instates the amenity of the original tree and the tree’s role as a public place.

The building has several civic roles. Re-instating the plaza around the tree re-establishes the location as a place of public gathering. The presence of the building creates a gateway to Barcaldine as it forms part of the railway station’s entry sequence. At the scale of the highway it acts as a signpost and at night as a lantern for the town.

The scale of the structure and the form created within, is based on the extent of the tree’s canopy between 1890 and 1905. The shape of this internal canopy is defined by approximately 3,600 individual timber members. All timber is recycled and third party certified for chain of custody.

The project re-instates a place of public gathering, the extent of the original canopy is re-defined, gentle movement is again visible overhead and with shadows on the ground, the amenity of the original tree is regained. With the relic tree looking on, old stories can be told and events remembered. As an experience, this is also a place where new memories can be created.

© Scott Burrows© Scott Burrows

About – The shearers’ strike:

The shearers’ strike, in conjunction with the maritime strike of 1890, played a crucial role in the historical connection between unions and what eventually became the Australian Labor Party.

The linking of May Day with Labour Day in Queensland began in Barcaldine on 1 May 1891, when striking shearers and bush workers marched through the streets.

The strike was broken five days later with the backing of the New South Wales and Queensland Governments when, on 6 May 1891, the colonial administration ordered the arrest of the shearer’s leaders on a number ofcharges including sedition and conspiracy.

Thirteen ringleaders were found guilty of conspiracy on 20 May 1891 at Rockhampton, and sentenced to three years’ hard labour in the gaol on Saint Helena island in Moreton Bay.

© public domain© public domain

The strike committee issued its final manifesto on 20 June 1891, calling for unionists to register on the electoral rolls.

As a result of losing the strike, the unions, and others in Queensland, formed ‘Labour Electoral Leagues’, which later became the ‘Labour Party’ and eventually the‘Australian Labor Party’.

The formation of the Labour Electoral Leagues led to the election in 1892, in Queensland, of a shearer, TJ Ryan, who became the first ‘Labour’ representative in any government, anywhere in the world.

© public domain© public domain

  • The Tree of Knowledge came to represent the culmination in Queensland of social tensions, which, by the 1880s, were widespread in the pastoral districts of the eastern colonies. The attitudes of squatters and property owners, the introduction of mechanical shearing and the influence of labour unions all played a part.
  • In April 2006 the Tree of Knowledge was poisoned and did not recover. A new memorial incorporating the remnants of the old tree was opened in May 2009. While the precise role of the tree during the shearers’ strike may be debated, the site will alwaysremain an important place of National Heritage.

© public domain© public domain

[highlight1]  Project Data  [/highlight1]

Project name: Tree of Knowledge Memorial
Location: Oak Street, Barcaldine, Queensland, Australia
Coordinates: -23.552264,145.289675
Type: Memorial & Museum Space, Public Space, Art in Architecture
Project Year: 2008-2009
Status: Completed
Cost: £3 million
Completion Year: May 2009
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Awards:

  • 2010 Australian Institute of Architects Awards – National Awards – The Lachlan Macquarie Award – Heritage Architecture
  • 2010 Australian Institute of Architects Awards – National Awards – National Commendation – Public Buildings
  • 2010 Australian Institute of Architects Awards – Queensland Regional and State Architecture Awards – State Award – Public Architecture
  • 2010 Australian Institute of Architects Awards – Queensland Regional and State Architecture Awards – Central Queensland Regional Award – JW Wilson Building of the Year Award
  • 2010 Australian Institute of Architects Awards – Queensland Regional and State Architecture Awards – Central Queensland Regional – Commendation
  • 2009 Australian Timber Design Awards – Overall Winner
  • 2009 Australian Timber Design Awards – Public or Commercial Buildings
  • 2009 Australian Timber Design Awards – Best use of Certified Timber
  • 2009 Australian Timber Design Awards – Queensland: Best Northern Region
  • 2009 Australian Timber Design Awards – Queensland: Public or Commercial Buildings (Northern Region)
  • 2006 Australian National Heritage List

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[highlight1]  The people  [/highlight1]

Client / Owner / Developer: Barcaldine Shire Council
Architects:

Project Team:

  • Project Manager: Michael Lavery
  • Project Architects: Brian Hooper, Ben Vielle
  • Graduate Designers: Helder Pereira, Emma Healy
  • Student Designer: Angela Winkle

Builder: McNab Constructions
Building surveyor: Philip Chun & Associates, Michael Moran
Council engineer: Barcaldine Shire Council
Electrical: Hawkins Jenkins Ross, Virendra Khatri
Heritage: Gordon Grimwade & Associates, Martin Rowney
Hydraulic: Thomson Kane Hydraulic, Mark Kane
Landscape: Gamble McKinnon Green Brisbane
Landscape consultant: Ross Gamble
Project manager: Angel Consulting, Barcaldine Shire Council
Structural: Bligh Tanner, Paul Callum
Town planning: John Gaskell Planning Consultants, John Gaskell
Traffic consultant: Viney Traffic Engineering Pty Ltd, Neil Viney
Text Description: © Courtesy of  M3 architecture, environment.gov.au
Images: © Brian Hooper Architect,  M3 architecture, Jon LinkinsScott Burrows

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[highlight1]  Location Map  [/highlight1]

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