A password will be e-mailed to you.

Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork

Zac Freeman builds layer upon layer of found objects, cast-offs and junk into portraits whose detail and subtlety only emerges with distance. In his Assemblage series, out of a seemingly chaotic collection of buttons, bottle tops, pen barrels, key caps, baby dolls and other three-dimensional scrap plastic objects appears an impressionistic two-dimensional face constructed from an impressive range of shades and tones.

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-2000-2006-Dave Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

2000-2006 Dave – © Zac Freeman

Freeman’s work has been commissioned for use in commercials for Absolut Vodka, appears in the Jacksonville Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami Museum of Science and Space, and the Art Collection of The Regency Group in Florida. He won the Art Chicago award in 2010, and has been exhibited at major art fairs in London, Miami, Chicago, Toronto, Houston and the Hamptons, New York. His piece Steve appears in the book The Art of Seeing by Paul Zelanski and Mary Pat Fisher (8th edition, Prentice Hall, 2010), and appears in and on the cover of Launching the Imagination by Professor Mary Stewart (4th edition, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2011).

Freeman graduated cum laude from his fine art degree at Jacksonville University, Florida, in 1997. He has collected junk and found objects for use in his creations since 1999.

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-2007-Jerry Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

2007 Jerry – © Zac Freeman

“The artworks are made entirely out of collected junk, found objects, and general trash. I glue the bits of junk to a wooden substrate to form an image, usually faces, which only can be seen at a distance. I was interested in communicating through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space. It is very important to me that I incorporate the actual objects into the art as opposed to a picture or rendition of it because it better expresses the intention of the artwork. I feel the junk is more powerful being present. It is an actual thing to be reckoned with that existed in this time and place and carries energy in and of itself. ” – Zac Freeman

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-2009-Garrett-02-759x481 Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

2009 Garrett 02 – © Zac Freeman

“I started making assemblage artworks of this type in 1999. The artworks are made entirely out of collected junk, found objects, and general trash. I glue the bits of junk to a wooden substrate to form an image, usually faces, which only can be seen at a distance. I was interested in communicating through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space. It is very important to me that I incorporate the actual objects into the art as opposed to a picture or rendition of it because it better expresses the intention of the artwork. I feel the junk is more powerful being present. It is an actual thing to be reckoned with that existed in this time and place and carries energy in and of itself.” – Zac Freeman

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-2010-David-01 Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

2010 David 01 – © Zac Freeman

Zac Freeman:

My work focuses primarily on portraits created by assembling found objects, disposable goods, and the leftover trash of things we consume in our society. I glue the bits of junk to a wooden substrate, a canvas, which forms the image of a portrait. The result is a stunningly realistic portrait at a distance and an interesting array of objects up close.

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-2010-Kathy Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

2010 Kathy – © Zac Freeman

I am interested in communicating through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and also communicating through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space.

It is very important to me that I incorporate the actual objects into the art as opposed to a picture or rendition of it because it better expresses the intention of the artwork. I feel the junk is more powerful being present. It is an actual thing to be reckoned with that existed in this time and place and carries energy in and of itself. The result is a time capsule of objects that reflects our culture.

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-2011-Justin-01 Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

2011 Justin 01 – © Zac Freeman

My assemblage artworks have continued to encapsulate cultural change. For example, grey film canister tops used in my early junk portraits are very rare now as our society has moved to digital cameras. An iPhone used as shading on a cheek looks desired one year and archaic the next as society, technology, and consumables continue to change.

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-2013-Justin-04-detail-759x569 Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

2013 Justin 04 (detail) – © Zac Freeman

Absolut Blank:

I was approached by Absolut Vodka to participate in their very famous “artist” series. Absolut started working with fine-artists in 1985 when pop icon Andy Warhol created the famous “Absolut Warhol” which quickly led to “Absolut Haring” and “Absolut Scharf.”

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-2011-absolut Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

2011 absolut – © Zac Freeman

The Absolut campaign this time around would pose the question that all creative types are faced with, which is, what would you do with a blank canvas. 18 artists were chosen from all over the world and under the tagline “It all starts with an Absolut Blank,” we were given blank canvases in the shape of the iconic vodka bottle. The campaign, which highlights various mediums of artistic expression, launched in the UK in July 2011.

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-2013-Justin-08-detail-759x569 Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

2013 Justin 08 (detail) – © Zac Freeman

I was honored to be a part of the “Absolut Blank” campaign and continue the long tradition of Absolut working with contemporary artists. Artists in the Absolut Blank project are Adhemas Batista, Aestethic Apparatus, Alex Trochut, Brett Amory, Dave Kinsey, David Bray, Eduardo Recife, Fernando Chamarelli, Good Wives & Warriors, Jeremy Fish, Ludovica Gioscia, Marcus Jansen, Mario Wagner, Morning Breath, Robert Mars, Sam Flores, Thomas Doyle, UVA, and Zac Freeman.

Recycled-Assemblage-Series-Portraits-Artwork-By-Zac-Freeman-Zac-in-Studio-03-759x569 Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman

Zac in Studio 03 – © Zac Freeman

Data :

Name: Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork
Type: Crafts
Materials: recycled PET – buttons, bottle tops, pen barrels, key caps, baby dolls and other three-dimensional scrap plastic objects
Dimensions: Varies
Theme Colour: soft colours
Year: 2000-2013
Technique: Assemblage on board by using the recycled objects

The people:

Artist: Zac Freeman – Jacksonville, Florida, United States
Text Description: © Courtesy of Zac Freeman, woolff gallery
Images: © Zac Freeman

Related Posts:

Recycled Assemblage Series Portraits Artwork / Zac Freeman
Reader Rating 3 Votes
6.9

Post's Gallery:

Send this to a friend