A password will be e-mailed to you.

The Boro Hotel

Architects Grzywinski+Pons have designed the new Boro hotel, with an interior and exterior that embrace the structure’s industrial aesthetics. The designers embraced the structure’s existing concrete and cinder blocks, but gave them warm, rich finishes. Features 108 rooms and is situated in the evolving Dutch Kills neighbourhood of Queens.

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-02-Floto_Warner-450x296 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

A bespoke range of furnishings was also created to give the interiors a high-end, boutique feel. ‘We approached the programme almost as though we were converting a disused industrial space to a new use,’ says Grzywinski+Pons. ‘In both the public spaces and the guest rooms we embraced the rawness of the project’s bones.’

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-03-Floto_Warner-450x300 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

In one end of the lobby, is a custom-designed communal table in front of a cement-brick wall that adds pattern and texture and also hides the main hotel office. Guests will check in with roving receptionists carrying tablets. “We wanted to take away that hierarchy of a front desk between you and the receptionist,” Grzywinski explains.

The lobby is an open loft space. Here, beyond the communal table, seen in the back, there is a freestanding bookcase backed by a banquette. “The books are behind fluted glass,” Grzywinski says. “We wanted the light to be a little bit diffused. And it acts as a vertical divide.”

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-05-Floto_Warner-450x281 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

“A lot of the palette was informed by the materials,” Grzywinski says. “There’s copper, brass, porcelain, and concrete, which we painted this sort of charcoal color, and then in addition to that we definitely wanted to pop with hues that were a little bit more saturated.” The bar acts as a railing for the big open staircase, which leads down to the bathrooms.

The painted open structure on the cork ceiling was initially made to be the mechanical hood for the fireplace. But, Grzywinski says, “we ended up doing a gel fire and still liked the way the hood worked, so we kept it.”

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-08-Floto_Warner-450x627 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

“We inherited the struc- ture of the building,” Grzy- winski says, “and its rawness was the best thing.” He and Pons maintained the industrial feel by using cement bricks and a slate countertop in another barand-café area.

The architects left the guest-room hallways in their raw state, save for polishing the concrete floors and painting the fire surfaces red (a code necessity that they say worked in their favor) and the ceiling the color of anthracite. Those simple tweaks created a crisp design dynamic.

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-09-Floto_Warner-450x300 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

Each room is furnished with a simple desk, reading lamp, and chair. The lichen-green-painted wood-paneled area behind the desk references wainscoting and acts to bring warmth to the concrete walls.

The lobby is an open loft space. Here, beyond the communal table, seen in the back, there is a freestanding bookcase backed by a banquette. “The books are behind fluted glass,” Grzywinski says. “We wanted the light to be a little bit diffused. And it acts as a vertical divide.”

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-21-Floto_Warner-450x351 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

Grzywinski+Pons:

The Boro is a 108 room hotel in the rapidly evolving neighborhood of Dutch Kills in New York City’s borough of Queens. While there are several existing flagged hotels in the area, the Boro is the first design-led bespoke offering that we hope will both further catalyze and respond to the exciting changes that are already evident.

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-24-Floto_Warner-450x351 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

When Grzywinski + Pons were commissioned to design the Boro Hotel, we (and our clients) inherited an already complete superstructure to define a massing and accept a building envelope that were not of our design. We had a small window of time and modest means within which we could make some minor changes before we focused on the interior so we concentrated those efforts on the glazing which would have the most impact on the interior architecture that was within our scope.

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-38-Floto_Warner-450x567 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

The building’s interiors were not so restrictive. By treating the unfinished structure like a found object, we approached the program almost as though we were converting a disused industrial space to a new use. In both the public spaces and the guest rooms we embraced the rawness of the project’s bones: principally cast in place concrete and cinder block. Upon this mantle we layered our palette of materials while extolling the virtues of the site and frame — light, soaring ceilings and unrivaled views of Manhattan. We were very conscious of using finishes that would yield a warm and happy environment even while acquiring a rich patina through time and use: hand scraped oak floors, painted pallet wood wainscoting and soffits, leather, cork and sisal to name a few. We also designed a bespoke range of furnishings to accompany some specified pieces. Expansive fenestration in the rooms celebrate the tableau that is New York City but we positioned muntins and mullions to add scale and evoke the proportions of the neighborhood’s industrial roots.

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-41-Floto_Warner-450x622 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

On the ground floor we tried to erase the division and the hierarchy implied by the traditional reception desk. A large table is populated by staff and guests alike and the check-in process capitalizes on mobile technology to liberate that service from any particular piece of furniture. A bar cum cafe also serves guests and customers and the lobby is replete with comfortable seating for all comers. In an attempt to balance the expansive conviviality of the space and its potential intimacy, we utilized program elements to yield semiprivate divisions within the contiguous volume.

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-43-Floto_Warner-450x505 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

All of the spaces, while divergent in function, were appointed to evoke the same mood and temperature throughout the hotel. Whether one is in the corridor, guest room, or any of the public spaces, the dialogue between the structure, services, light, texture and colors is consistent. It was our goal to create a setting from which to explore New York that was unpretentiously sophisticated and as warm and cheerful as it is urban.

The-Boro-Hotel-By-Grzywinski-Pons-56-Floto_Warner-450x351 The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons© Floto+Warner

Project Data

Project name: The Boro Hotel
Location: 38-28 27th St, Long Island City, Queens, New York, NY 11101 United States
Coordinates: 40.754739, -73.935790
Type: Hotel Interior
Hotel size: 108 rooms
Project Area: 48,000 sq.ft / 4,320 sqm
Status: Built
Completion Date/Year: 2015
Visit The Boro Hotel’s website: here

The people:

Client / Owner / Developer: The Boro Hotel
Interior Designer: Grzywinski+Pons – 594 Broadway Suite 1214, New York, NY 10012 USA
Text Description: © Courtesy of The Boro Hotel, Grzywinski+Pons, nymag
Images: © The Boro Hotel, Grzywinski+Pons, Floto+Warner

Location Map:

Related Posts:

The Boro Hotel / Grzywinski+Pons
Reader Rating 1 Vote
6.6

Post's Gallery:

Send this to a friend