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The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Lumiere London is a major new light festival that, over four evenings, transforms many of the capital’s most iconic streets and buildings in the West End and King’s Cross. It brings together some of the world’s most exciting artists working with light. Expect large-scale video-mapped projections, interactive pieces and jaw-dropping installations.

Developed by creative producers Artichoke and supported by the Mayor of London, Lumiere London runs from 14th-17th January 2016. The festival re-imagine London’s urban landscape and architecture in 30 artworks across four main areas: King’s Cross; Mayfair and Grosvenor Square; Piccadilly, Regent Street, Leicester Square and St James’s; and Trafalgar Square and Westminster.

With founding support from Atom Bank, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Heart of London Business Alliance, London & Partners and King’s Cross, plus additional support from a host of partners and sponsors, including Westminster City Council, Lumiere London has transformed parts of London’s West End and King’s Cross into a glittering pedestrian playground.

Lumiere London aims to attract Londoners and tourists alike into the heart of the capital during what is traditionally one of the quieter months of the year. Festival visitors are being encouraged to explore the dazzling night-time gallery on foot, discovering parts of the capital for the first time and seeing familiar sights in a new light.

There are easy walking routes between many of the 30 exhibits and plenty of opportunities to stay and linger over a drink or a meal at the many venues and attractions along the way.

Walking routes include: from Leicester Square through to Trafalgar Square and Westminster Abbey; from Piccadilly Circus to Grosvenor Square via Piccadilly Arcade and St James’s; along Regent Street via Carnaby to Oxford Circus; and from Euston Road to King’s Cross, Granary Square and beyond.

At Westminster Abbey, French digital artist Patrice Warrener used his chromalithe technique to “paint” the Abbey’s West Gate in an electric riot of colour. The Light of the Spirit was highlighted the series of stone statues above the Great West Door including Dr Martin Luther King and El Salvadorean Bishop Oscar Romero, as well as parts of the two Western Towers built by Christopher Wren and Nicholas Hawksmoor.

In Piccadilly, the Lumineoles light sculptures have danced with the elements, while on the façade of BAFTA 195 Piccadilly, leading stars and directors of British screen and TV appeared as part of 195 Piccadilly, a dynamic, technicolour artwork by Newcastle-based studio NOVAK, with a striking soundtrack by Ed Carter. Exploring the different genres of cinema and television and using images from BAFTA’s archive, including Michael Caine, Olivia Coleman, Idris Elba, Steve McQueen, and Julie Walters, the piece have draw out the architectural features of the building and refer to its origins as the home of the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours. (Supported by Levy Real Estate and in partnership with Heart of London Business Alliance and BAFTA 195 Piccadilly)

At King’s Cross, visitors able to explore the area, its buildings and spaces through 11 installations and projected artworks, including Circus of Light, a magical animation across the breadth of the repurposed Granary Building especially commissioned for the festival from Portuguese studio Ocubo, and Diver by Ron Haselden, a 17-metre light sculpture at the King’s Cross Swimming Pond Club.

10 INSTALLATIONS HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:

1.8-London-by-Janet-Echelman-Studio-Echelman-01-759x658 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

1.8 London by Janet Echelman – Studio Echelman – © Lumiere London Light Festival

1.8 London by Janet Echelman – Studio Echelman

Echelman’s soft, voluminous net sculpture surges 180 feet through the air between buildings above Oxford Circus, the busiest pedestrian area in all of London.

The monumental floating form is composed of layers of fiber, braided and knotted together in vibrant hues that pulse with changing wind and weather to create a choreography of undulating color. At night, the sculpture comes to life with projected colored light. The precise colors and patterns are created interactively with members of the public, who are invited to use their smartphones to select colors and tap out patterns with the touch of a finger. These patterns are projected onto the monumental surface of the sculpture, and proceed to interact with one another, creating ripple effects for all to see.

The work’s title is 1.8, referring to the length of time in microseconds that the earth’s day was shortened as a result of a single physical event, the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that emanated from Japan. The sculpture’s form was inspired by data sets of the tsunami’s wave heights rippling across the entire Pacific Ocean. The artwork delves into content related to our complex interdependencies with larger cycles of time and our physical world. The sculpture’s net structure is a physical manifestation of interconnectedness – when any one element moves, every other element is affected.

Lightweight and flexible, the sculpture is designed to travel to other cites around the world after its 2016 London premiere. It is constructed from technical fibers that are 15 times stronger than steel by weight, and custom color blends that Echelman combines with programmed colored light to create the final artwork.

The artwork invites you to pause amid the bustle and commotion, offering a chance to gaze skyward and contemplate a physical manifestation of the interconnectedness surrounding us.

Artist: Janet Echelman – Studio Echelman – 64-R Coolidge Street, Brookline, MA 02446, United States
Location: Oxford Circus, London, UK

Video:

195-Piccadilly-by-NOVAK-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

195 Piccadilly by NOVAK – © Lumiere London Light Festival

195 Piccadilly by NOVAK

195 Piccadilly explores the different genres of cinema and television using images from BAFTA’s archive.

The overall aesthetic refers to the origins of 195 Piccadilly as the home of the Royal Society of Watercolour Painters. The animation is accompanied by a striking soundtrack, created by Ed Carter and inspired by the classic sounds that helped define these genres of film and television.

NOVAK are an award-winning creative studio based in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, who specialise in motion design and immersive experiences. They work with clients across the globe and showcase their work to international audiences.

NOVAK produce a diverse selection of works and exist in both the artistic and commercial worlds.

Through large-scale visual presentation and projection mapping, NOVAK create spectacular works that go beyond simple eye candy, but are informed and inspired by the works’ location and social significance. NOVAK’s work is visually stunning while conveying historical narrative and providing geographical relevance that resonates deeply with broad audiences.

In addition, NOVAK create outstanding 2D and 3D motion design for television and web broadcast along with show-stealing visuals that accompany chart-topping musicians around the world. See more at novakcollective.com.

Artist: NOVAK – The Biscuit Tin Studios, Studio 29, Warwick Street, Newcastle, upon Tyne, NE2 1BB United Kingdom
Location: Piccadilly, London

Video:

Circus-of-Light-by-Ocubo-01-759x507 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Circus of Light by Ocubo – © Lumiere London Light Festival

Circus of Light by Ocubo

195 Piccadilly explores the different genres of cinema and television using images from BAFTA’s archive.

The overall aesthetic refers to the origins of 195 Piccadilly as the home of the Royal Society of Watercolour Painters. The animation is accompanied by a striking soundtrack, created by Ed Carter and inspired by the classic sounds that helped define these genres of film and television.

NOVAK are an award-winning creative studio based in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, who specialise in motion design and immersive experiences. They work with clients across the globe and showcase their work to international audiences.

NOVAK produce a diverse selection of works and exist in both the artistic and commercial worlds.

Through large-scale visual presentation and projection mapping, NOVAK create spectacular works that go beyond simple eye candy, but are informed and inspired by the works’ location and social significance. NOVAK’s work is visually stunning while conveying historical narrative and providing geographical relevance that resonates deeply with broad audiences.

In addition, NOVAK create outstanding 2D and 3D motion design for television and web broadcast along with show-stealing visuals that accompany chart-topping musicians around the world. See more at novakcollective.com.

Artist: Ocubo – Rua Quinta da Boa Esperança, 22 2710-063-Sintra, Portugal
Location: Granary Square, King’s Cross

Video:

Garden-of-Light-by-TILT-03-759x506 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Garden of Light by TILT – © Lumiere London Light Festival

Garden of Light by TILT

Created by two lighting technicians, François Fouilhé and Jean-Baptiste Laude in 2001, TILT is a collective that aims to give prominence to light art. Encouraging audiences to view it from a new perspective, TILT create luminous, dreamlike structures using recycled materials and highly technical production.

TILT is a French collective that reclaim public space for their art. They create luminous, dreamlike structures using recycled materials processed to high technical production quality.

Founders François Fouilhé and Jean-Baptiste Laude started the collective to give prominence to light art and to encourage audiences to view it from a new perspective.

Enjoy this magical collection of plant sculptures.

Forget about the cold; let the glow of giant flowers and trees full of multi-coloured leaves keep you warm.

Artist: TILT – Mangache 26400 Eurre – France
Location: Leicester Square

Light-Graffiti-by-Floating-Pictures-02-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Light Graffiti by Floating Pictures – © Lumiere London Light Festival

Light Graffiti by Floating Pictures

As part of Lumiere 2016: the first official light festival to hit London, Floating Pictures is proud to present Light Graffiti. The installation will be shown at Kings Cross.

Light Graffiti is an interactive installation that invites audiences to use a torch or any other source of light to paint the street. The installation uses a USB camera, projector and computer to transform light sources into a paintbrush, allowing users to repaint the space as they wish. Using this unconventional ‘spray can’, everyone is welcome to experiment with different colours, strokes and patterns on the street, the walls or on oneself.

Let light be your spray can!:

Light Graffiti in King’s Cross is an interactive installation that invites audiences to use smartphone torches or any other source of light to paint onto their surroundings.

This innovative installation uses a USB camera, projector and computer to transform light sources into a paintbrush, allowing users to decorate the area as they wish. Using this unconventional “spray can”, experiment with different colours, strokes and patterns, and let your imagination run wild!

Floating Pictures are a Stockholm-based art production company creating site-specific works in public spaces using interactive design, projection technology, light installations, film and video art. The company aims to use new media to create visually and artistically innovative experiences for audiences.

This piece has been created in collaboration with Digital Art Center (Stockholm University) and Pew Square.

Artist: Floating Pictures
Location: King’s Cross

Litre-of-Light-by-Mick-Stephenson-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Litre of Light by Mick Stephenson – © Lumiere London Light Festival

Litre of Light by Mick Stephenson

This installation highlights how simple technology changes thousands of peoples lives across the world. How do you create a sustainable light bulb? By filling a plastic bottle with water, adding a drop of bleach and pushing it through a hole in the roof, you can refract as much sunlight through it as a 55-watt bulb.

Developed by Alfred Moser and students at MIT, MyShelter Foundation have since brought this simple idea to communities in developing countries and post-disaster areas worldwide. Further developments using solar cells now allow the same technology to bring light to whole communities for the first time.

In a collaboration between artist Mick Stephenson and Central St Martin’s students, issues relating to poverty, sustainability and climate change inform the design of a pavilion.

Filled with bottles designed during workshops with local school children, Litre of Light will ask us to acknowledge the growing need for alternative technologies to support our everyday lives.

Artist: Mick Stephenson
Location: King’s Cross

Lumineoles-by-Porte-par-le-vent-02-759x505 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Lumineoles by Porte par le vent – © Lumiere London Light Festival

Lumineoles by Porte par le vent

Lit by LEDs, these brightly coloured fish dance gracefully with the elements, delighting audiences as they float and swoop through the air. Look out for the exotic flower lanterns adorning the Piccadilly area.

Porté par le vent take inspiration from light and the elements for their beautiful creations, transforming everyday locations into atmospheric dreamlands. Venture into their imaginary world and see Piccadilly as never before.

Artist: Porte par le vent – 16 Rue Labatie, 07300 Tournon-sur-Rhône, France
Location: Piccadilly area

Video:

Plastic-Islands-by-Luzinterruptus-02-759x505 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Plastic Islands by Luzinterruptus – © Lumiere London Light Festival

Plastic Islands by Luzinterruptus

Glowing rubbish fills the fountains of Trafalgar Square, forming floating shapes of plastic.

Plastic Islands is inspired by the ‘Eighth Continent’: the ‘Garbage Patch’ of marine litter that accumulates in the North Pacific Ocean. It comments on the alarming rate that rubbish is swallowing large areas of the Pacific Ocean and the lack of action to tackle this problem. Made from thousands of bottles, this installation both awakens and astounds audiences with its message.

Luzinterruptus are an anonymous artistic group, implementing urban interventions in public spaces. Light is an integral part of their work, and is used to draw attention to social, environmental and political issues within cities and other environments. Although much of Luzinterruptus’ work has an element of activism, they also focus on highlighting forgotten and unused corners of urban spaces.

Artist: Luzinterruptus
Location: Trafalgar Square

Platonic-Spin-by-Nathaniel-Rackowe-01-759x569 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Platonic Spin by Nathaniel Rackowe – © Lumiere London Light Festival

Platonic Spin by Nathaniel Rackowe

Interlocking rectangles of glowing wire are strung together to form the outside of a dodecahedron, one of the fundamental three-dimensional building blocks of the universe.

Platonic Spin is split into rectangles, and each rectangle will light up in turn, creating a sense of movement and shifting composition, gaining in speed and momentum until it becomes one single form moving in space.

Nathaniel Rackowe’s work will be found in the Main Plaza at Regent’s Place near Euston, and is heavily influenced by cities. The British sculptor is based in London, and his interest in neon reflects the light sources of such urban landscapes. Often creating large-scale structures, he uses recognisable man-made materials (like scaffolding and shed doors) mixing this with kinetic elements and employing a raw aesthetic that leaves wiring clearly visible.

Artist: Nathaniel Rackowe
Location: Regent’s Place Plaza

Video:

The Light of The Spirit by Patrice Warrener

Multicoloured martyrs decorate magnificent Westminster Abbey.

The Light of the Spirit envelops the West Front of the capital’s beautiful Westminster Abbey in colour and light. The projection highlights the architectural mastery of the building and audiences witness the glorious statuettes of 20th-century martyrs reimagined.

Usually perched unobtrusively on the façade above the Great West Doors, these figures are transformed into kaleidoscopic illuminations, a tribute to their lives in technicolour.

Patrice Warrener is recognised worldwide for his chromolithe projection system. His polychromatic illumination of buildings gives the impression of a spectacularly bright painted surface. He has designed more than 80 astounding creations and continues to share this unique art form across the globe.

Artist: Patrice Warrener
Location: Westminster Abbey

Video:

Aquarium-by-Benedetto-Bufalino-Benoit-Deseille-03-759x506 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Aquarium by Benedetto Bufalino + Benoit Deseille – © Lumiere London Light Festival


binaryWaves-by-LABau-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

binaryWaves by LAB[au] – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Brothers-Sisters-by-Ron-Haselden-01-759x506 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Brothers & Sisters by Ron Haselden – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Dissect-I-and-Dissect-II-by-Sarah-Blood-01-759x427 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Dissect I and Dissect II by Sarah Blood – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Diver-by-Ron-Haselden-03-759x497 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Diver by Ron Haselden – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Dresses-by-Tae-gon-KIM-03-759x427 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Dresses by Tae gon KIM – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Elephantastic-by-Top-La-Design-02-759x420 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Elephantastic by Top La Design – © Lumiere London Light Festival


I-Havent-Changed-My-Mind-in-a-Thousand-Years-by-Beth-J-Ross-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

I Haven’t Changed My Mind in a Thousand Years by Beth J Ross – © Lumiere London Light Festival


IFO-Identified-Flying-Object-by-Jacques-Rival-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by Jacques Rival – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Joining-the-Dots-by-Cleary-Connolly-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Joining the Dots by Cleary Connolly – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Keyframes-by-Groupe-LAPS-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Keyframes by Groupe LAPS – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Les-Voyageurs-The-Travellers-by-Cedric-Le-Borgne-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Les Voyageurs (The Travellers) by Cedric Le Borgne – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Lightbenches-by-Bernd-Spiecker-for-LBO-LichtBankObjekte-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Lightbenches by Bernd Spiecker for LBO LichtBankObjekte – © Lumiere London Light Festival


MORE-NOISE-by-Tim-Etchell-03-759x506 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

MORE NOISE by Tim Etchell – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Neon-Dogs-by-Deepa-Mann-Kler-london-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Neon Dogs by Deepa Mann-Kler london – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Pipette-–-King’s-Cross-Tunnel-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Pipette – King’s Cross Tunnel by Miriam Sleeman, Tom Sloan, Allies & Morrison, Speirs + Major – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Sanctuary-by-Sarah-Blood-01-759x506 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Sanctuary by Sarah Blood – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Shaida-Walking.-2015-by-Julian-Opie-01-759x427 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Shaida Walking. 2015 by Julian Opie – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Spectra-3-by-FIELD.io-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Spectra-3 by FIELD.io – © Lumiere London Light Festival


Spinning-Night-in-Living-Colour-by-Elaine-Buckholtz-01-759x361 The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016

Spinning Night in Living Colour by Elaine Buckholtz – © Lumiere London Light Festival

About: Artichoke

Producers of extraordinary live events, Artichoke is one of the country’s leading creative companies and is a registered charity, funded by Arts Council England. At Artichoke we use art to undermine the mundane and disrupt the everyday, and create a new kind of world that we’d all like to live in.

Our previous projects include Royal de Luxe’s The Sultan’s Elephant, which brought an estimated one million people onto the streets of London in 2006; La Machine’s 50foot high mechanical spider for Liverpool’s Capital of Culture celebrations in 2008; Antony Gormley’s One & Other 100-day long invasion of the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square in London in 2009; and Deborah Warner’s commission for the London 2012 Festival, Peace Camp, a nationwide celebration of landscape and poetry, which took place across eight separate sites around the UK; and most recently, Temple by David Best in Derry~Londonderry, attended by more than 60,000 people.

Artichoke creates and produces Lumiere, the UK’s largest light festival, which has been staged in the medieval English city of Durham every two years since 2009; and in Derry~Londonderry in Northern Ireland as part of the celebrations for City of Culture 2013. It returned to Durham in November 2015 attracting an estimated 200,000 visitors.

Data:

Name: Lumiere London
Location: London, United Kingdom
Type: Light Art
Year: 2016
Event Period: 14th – 17th January 2016

The people:

Developer: Artichoke – Trust, Toynbee Studios 28 Commercial Street London, E1 6AB
Supported: Mayor of London
Text Description: © Courtesy of Artichoke, visitlondon, Lumiere London
Images: © Lumiere London

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The installations for Lumiere London Light Festival 2016
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